Certificate Programs

Certificate students have an extraordinary exposure to the art and design world of Paris and come away with new skills and experiences that will enrich their artistic vision and permanently impact their view of the world.

The intensive curriculum of the Paris College of Art certificate programs offers a non-degree option for those wishing to launch a career transition, refine a professional level design portfolio, or prepare for entering a Masters degree program. The certificate programs are ideally suited for the mature student who already has an undergraduate degree and wishes to complete his/her education with a professional art and design concentration. These programs emphasize skill development and provide a solid foundation in the process, technology, and language of art and design.

Working side-by-side with our degree students, certificate students have access to all studio facilities, services and partnerships that the school has to offer.

Students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours for the one-year certificate program. Studying full-time (minimum of 12 credits per semester), certificate students with the guidance of their academic advisor, develop an individualized program specifically catered to their needs and interests.

Certificate Program Curricula

Credits

Communication Design

fall

Type Core: Design

Code
FCMD 0237
Description

This core studio course offers an in-depth study of letterforms and their relationship to space and furnishes the foundations of mastering the relationship between concept, form, layout and communication. Students evaluate and prioritize information based on size, weight and positioning of letterforms. They learn the importance of eye travel and movement, and examine the past, present and future development in typography. Using the pencil, brush, camera and computer, emphasis is placed on the development of strong communication skills. While this is essentially a studio course, occasional theoretical readings are proposed in order to foster a critical assessment of the typographic history and to stimulate an awareness of contemporary issues in both print and multimedia design.

Prerequisite(s): Foundation Year or Equivalent

 

Type Core: Concept

Code
FCMD 0238
Description

This core studio course introduces students to a variety of design methods and materials used throughout the communication design field. Students learn basic design methodology from researching to conceptualizing to execution, as well as the importance of design thinking. A variety of projects will introduce the student to the manipulation of two-dimensional space through an exploration of typography. Students will use a combination of hand skills and digital skills to complete assignments. While this course is essentially a studio course, occasional theoretical readings are proposed in order to foster a critical assessment of the media and to stimulate an awareness of contemporary issues in both print and multimedia design.

Prerequisite(s): Foundation Year 2D Integrated Studio 1 & 2 or Equivalent.

Form: Core Lab

Code
FCMD 0224
Description

The manner in which an idea or finished project is presented is crucial. Improve your ability to communicate visually in this hands-on design workshop in which a variety of both traditional and contemporary tools and techniques are used to produce tangible documents for presentation. This class will, however, give students the opportunity to take their work beyond the presentation stage, as some of the projects will be printed professionally. Students will be required to produce print specifications which include choice of paper, use of color (i.e. Pantone or CMYK), size of print run, finishing, etc.

Motion Graphics

Code
FCMD 0323
Description

This course develops the design methodology and technical skills to produce time-based linear narratives, animations, television graphics, opening credits, music videos, etc. The integration of sound and image is central to the development of motion graphics projects. After Effects and Final Cut are the principal programs taught in this class, along with the language and tools of motion graphics. Students learn to develop concepts and storyboards before commencing their final drafts.

Web I

Code
FCMD 0330
Description

This junior laboratory/technology studio course focuses on the design process and technical background required for designing effective interactive experiences, with an emphasis on design methodology for evolving systems. HTML, JavaScript, CSS, Flash, and Web 2.0 CMS will be introduced along with specialized web design, imaging and animation tools. Students will design and mock up websites. The second semester delves further into notions of interface design, information architecture and web infrastructure.

Prerequisites: 2D Integrated Studio 1 + 2 or equivalent. Semester 1 or equivalent are prerequisite for semester 2.

Studio Elective

Description

You may select an elective from the many course offerings in your department or in other departments with the approval of your department chair.

Introduction To Design Studies

Code
FLIB 2212
Description

This course focuses on how design processes, design products, and design discourse are interrelated. It encourages students to reflect and write critically about design and provides them with a foundation in research methods that impact design practice. Readings from leading designers, theorists and historians lead students to situate their own approaches to design within a swiftly changing contemporary context, while visual materials and visits to design-related exhibitions allow them to broaden their base of design references.

spring

Form: Core Concept

Code
FCMD 0235
Description

The second part of this yearlong course builds on last semesters Type Studio: Concept course. Emphasis is again placed on methodology, research and conceptual development as well as the successful communication of ideas. Through a series of applied assignments that focus on form, a stronger set of visual, conceptual, technical and verbal skills will be developed. Structured progressively, assignments will culminate in a complete and coherent identity and expose students to various creative approaches. Through this process students will gain a deeper understanding of the role form plays in the design process, focusing on the intellectual, practical, and emotional characteristics that construct meaning through form (usefulness, usability and desirability). Through lectures, hands-on exercises, assignments, critiques students will learn to use typography to solve communication and visual problems.

Form: Core Design

Code
FCMD 0234
Description

An in depth study of letterforms and their relationship to space. Students evaluate and prioritize information for communication based on size, weight and positioning of letterforms. They understand the importance of eye travel and movement. They examine the past, present and future development in typography. Using the pencil, brush, camera and computer, emphasis is placed on the development of communications. We will criticize the work, compare notes, discuss, look at documentations, books, read, do research together. Becoming well-versed in typography will help you in many ways, regardless of your creative direction & areas of concentration. As visual communicators, you will not only work with images but with words too.By understanding typography history, language, applications & power, your strength as a designer will be heightened. Once you understand the principles, you will be free to play.

Form: Core Lab

Code
FCMD 0224
Description

The manner in which an idea or finished project is presented is crucial. Improve your ability to communicate visually in this hands-on design workshop in which a variety of both traditional and contemporary tools and techniques are used to produce tangible documents for presentation. This class will, however, give students the opportunity to take their work beyond the presentation stage, as some of the projects will be printed professionally. Students will be required to produce print specifications which include choice of paper, use of color (i.e. Pantone or CMYK), size of print run, finishing, etc.

Interactive Media Design

Code
FCMD 0236
Description

This studio course requires a basic knowledge of computer graphics and is centered on multimedia authoring software. The focus is authorship, in that more so than a formgiver, the designer acts as a content creator familiar with advanced concepts in interactive multimedia. Students are encouraged to conceptualize, design, prepare and program a multimedia project for eventual publication on the internet.

Prerequisites: Digital Imaging and Multimedia or equivalent

Web II

Code
FCMD 0331
Description

This junior laboratory/technology studio course focuses on the design process and technical background required for designing effective interactive experiences, with an emphasis on design methodology for evolving systems. HTML, JavaScript, CSS, Flash, and Web 2.0 CMS will be introduced along with specialized web design, imaging and animation tools. Students will design and mock up websites. The second semester delves further into notions of interface design, information architecture and web infrastructure.

Prerequisites: 2D Integrated Studio 1 + 2 or equivalent. Semester 1 or equivalent are prerequisite for semester 2.

Studio Elective

Description

You may select an elective from the many course offerings in your department or in other departments with the approval of your department chair.

Design Management

fall

Introduction To Design Management

Code
FDMT 0122
Description

This course explores what is design management and gives an overview of topics and issues central to the subject, with an emphasis on understanding the basic skills required to become a design manager/strategic designer and the kinds of careers and futures design managers and entrepreneurs may enjoy. Why should we pay attention to design and why/how can we integrate design to coherent business strategies are other issues addressed in this course.

Project Management

Code
FDMT 0275
Description

This course addresses practical issues of project management. Emphasis is placed on understanding how to create a project plan and manage a team to meet the scope of the project, milestones and deliverables.

Entrepreneurship

Code
FDMT 0202
Description

This course introduces students to the world of entrepreneurs by giving them access to the Parisian ecosystem of entrepreneurship and innovation. Students will meet young entrepreneurs and learn about what it takes to generate and develop a new business, understand the challenges and the common mistakes to avoid, but also the opportunities and tactics for growing a business. The course is also the occasion to analyze a variety of business models and learn how to generate a successful business model.

Social Documentary

Code
FHOT 0240
Description

Social documentary photography is a narrative genre of photography emphasizing information over impression. This course, which uses both traditional 35mm and digital photo materials, introduces students to the history and practice of social documentary photography, its tools and techniques. The first part of the course will provide a brief historical overview and then focus on issues of content, editorial processes, sequencing, production and presentation. The second part of the course will engage students in critical discussions surrounding photography and objectivity but also address political, social and ethical implications such as voyeurism, victimization, exploitation, etc. Students are expected to create photographic narratives, that reflect a critical awareness and an understanding of contemporary approaches and strategies.

Experience Design Studio I

Code
FDMT 0360
Description

In this Experience Design Studio, students will answer a design experience brief by generating and developing a design concept. Students put in practice all the skills learned so far, from human-centered design, project management to sustainable design and business. Presentations, readings, lectures, field trips and visiting designers will round out the coursework.

Innovation & Organizations

Code
FDMT 0403
Description

This course provides Design Management students with the necessary vocabulary and practical know-how to “survive” as a future (strategic) designer working within or for different organizations wanting to innovate. Students will learn that (1) Organizations are often very complex and multifarious environments (2) Multiple, often opposite points of view exist within such organization and (3) In order to propose innovative solutions to everyday problems, practitioners must be able to understand and relate to these different points of views.

spring

Human-Centered Design

Code
FDMT 0105
Description

This course is an introduction to human-centered design methods. Drawing on cultural and social sciences, the course gives an overview, both theoretical and practical, of the different techniques that can be deployed throughout the design process in order to ensure the fit between the design of products and services and the material and socio-cultural contexts in which these products and services are ultimately used and experienced. As such, the course aims at providing students with a theoretical framework to understand socio-cultural and material contexts as well as the practical and analytical tools to explore them.

Finance and Accounting

Code
FDMT 0225
Description

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the principles and practices of financial statement analysis. The course therefore assumes only minimal knowledge by most students of financial accounting and finance. Primary emphasis is placed on mathematical problems and concepts relevant to financial and operational business applications, including regression, forecasting, sampling and statistical analysis. This course also lays the groundwork for more advanced study in finance and international business transactions in the fourth year.

Marketing

Code
FDMT 0205
Description

This introductory course focuses on the theories and principles of standard marketing strategies and practices, so that students may begin to develop a framework for understanding marketing tactics and strategies useful for design-driven and other creative businesses. The course’s goals are to introduce students to marketing strategy and to the elements of marketing analysis (customer analysis, competitor analysis, and company analysis), as well as to familiarize them with the elements of the marketing mix (product strategy, pricing, advertising and promotion, and distribution).

Sustainable Design & Business

Code
FDMT 0301
Description

This course explores the field and principles of sustainability and their impact on design and business, from cradle to cradle to the ten principles of One Planet Living for example. Students learn about life-cycle and life cycle analysis and get to understand what a sustainable business and design strategy entails.

Experience Design Studio II

Code
FDMT 0360
Description

In this Experience Design Studio, students will answer a design experience brief by generating and developing a design concept. Students put in practice all the skills learned so far, from human-centered design, project management to sustainable design and business. Presentations, readings, lectures, field trips and visiting designers will round out the coursework.

Fashion Design

fall

Pattern Drafting I

Code
FFAS 0297
Description

Students develop an understanding of professional pattern making, metric pattern cutting, and drafting skills. They learn about the architecture of garments and the technical implications of flat construction for the fit and construct basic patterns for skirts, trousers, bodices, dresses, shirts, sleeves, hoods and collars. In the second semester, more advanced methods and techniques are explored. Individual design projects encourage students to experiment with patterns and construct the garments.

Prerequisites: Foundation core studios – Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.

3D Fashion Design I

Code
FFAS 0240
Description

This course introduces the 3D form, fabrics and basic garment construction. Through the practice of draping muslin on the mannequin, fabrics workshops and analysis students learn how 2D materials become 3D forms. The foundation of pattern shapes: bodices, skirts, sleeves, and collars are covered as are essential technical skills and garment assembly techniques. Weekly briefs encourage intensive 3D research and exploration of a variety of methods and techniques. The course initiates a flexible, experimental and critical approach towards materials, volumes, and shapes from which design concepts emanate in an individual, personal, problem-solving process.

Prerequisites: Foundation core studios – Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.

Fashion Drawing II: Digital

Code
FFAS 0208
Description

Practical application of appropriate computer software is a must to meet the demands of a hectic fashion market. This course explores CAD software techniques used in the fashion industry to enrich the possibilities of communication skills. Students will learn how to use vector drawings to create technical flats of garments, and basic rendering textile techniques to enhance digital image presentation.

Prerequisites: foundation core studios – semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.

Fashion Drawing I: Digital

Code
FFAS 0207
Description

Practical application of appropriate computer software is a must to meet the demands of a hectic fashion market. This course explores CAD software techniques used in the fashion industry to enrich the possibilities of communication skills. Students will learn how to use vector drawings to create technical flats of garments, and basic rendering textile techniques to enhance digital image presentation.

Prerequisites: foundation core studios – semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.

Collection Concepts Development I

Code
FFAS 0332
Description

This course teaches students how to generate and develop various highly individual design concepts related to specific, identified market levels and product segments. Different principles of collection work and collection concepts are applied to set project briefs. Methods of presentation in relation to the fashion design portfolio enhance appropriate visuals for the fashion design process. Observational fashion, design, and trend research sketchbooks form part of this course, as well as external project briefs, which are reviewed and assessed by professionals from the French fashion and clothing industry (e.g. Designer Critic Project).

Prerequisites: Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.

History of Fashion

Code
FHCA 0227
Description

This course investigates the visual history of fashion, focusing on France from the Ancien Régime via the Revolution to the present day, and with a particular focus on primary sources available in the museums and archives of Paris. Weekly units explore historical European fashion trends – their details, silhouettes, fabrics and embellishments – in their original social, political, economic, aesthetic and spiritual contexts. Influences and parallel developments in other countries are also covered in this class, as are connections between the fashion industry, theatre, film, and the fine arts. Students are introduced to research practices and encouraged to reflect on design and style choices rooted in fashion history.

spring

Pattern Drafting II

Code
FFAS 0298
Description

Students develop an understanding of professional pattern making, metric pattern cutting, and drafting skills. They learn about the architecture of garments and the technical implications of flat construction for the fit and construct basic patterns for skirts, trousers, bodices, dresses, shirts, sleeves, hoods and collars. In the second semester, more advanced methods and techniques are explored. Individual design projects encourage students to experiment with patterns and construct the garments.

Prerequisites: Foundation core studios – Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.

3D Fashion Design II

Code
FFAS 0241
Description

This course introduces the 3D form, fabrics and basic garment construction. Through the practice of draping muslin on the mannequin, fabrics workshops and analysis students learn how 2D materials become 3D forms. The foundation of pattern shapes: bodices, skirts, sleeves, and collars are covered as are essential technical skills and garment assembly techniques. Weekly briefs encourage intensive 3D research and exploration of a variety of methods and techniques. The course initiates a flexible, experimental and critical approach towards materials, volumes, and shapes from which design concepts emanate in an individual, personal, problem-solving process.

Prerequisites: Foundation core studios – Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.

Fashion Drawing: Hand II

Code
FFAS 0206
Description

This course teaches fashion hand drawing techniques mainly from live fashion models; first it will focus on body proportions, body details and body movement to later concentrate on the stylized fashion figure, allowing students to synthesize and create their own ideas.
Students will analyze the behavior of the fabric on the body, how different types of clothing hangs and reacts to movement.
Volume and perspective will be a subject of study through lights-shadow and forth-shortening techniques, which help students to situate their fashion figures in the space and prepare them to design clothes as “soft sculptures”, a bridge from 2D to 3D.

Prerequisites: foundation core studios – semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.

Fashion Drawing II: Digital

Code
FFAS 0208
Description

Practical application of appropriate computer software is a must to meet the demands of a hectic fashion market. This course explores CAD software techniques used in the fashion industry to enrich the possibilities of communication skills. Students will learn how to use vector drawings to create technical flats of garments, and basic rendering textile techniques to enhance digital image presentation.

Prerequisites: foundation core studios – semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.

Collection Concept Development II

Code
FFAS 0333
Description

This course teaches students how to generate and develop various highly individual design concepts related to specific, identified market levels and product segments. Different principles of collection work and collection concepts are applied to set project briefs. Methods of presentation in relation to the fashion design portfolio enhance appropriate visuals for the fashion design process. Observational fashion, design, and trend research sketchbooks form part of this course, as well as external project briefs, which are reviewed and assessed by professionals from the French fashion and clothing industry (e.g. Designer Critic Project).

Prerequisites: Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.

Fine Arts

fall

Painting: Interactions I

Code
FFAR 0317
Description

In order to evolve and discover new pictorial horizons painting today must remain open to the possibility of a dialogue with the wide range of multidisciplinary influences that are available. Where once the field of exploration was defined by the rigueur and strict dictates of a formal training.

The strength of painting today lies in its flexibility to use such training and adapt to the influences of other 2D and 3D disciplines and the pictorial possibilities that they offer as art experience. The possibility to create an art experience through research, experimentation and interaction are the key components in the junior year in painting. With this as a core component the dynamics of painting are explored through a variety of set projects designed to stimulate the individual imagination.

Prerequisites: Sophomore year painting

Creative & Experimental Drawing

Code
FFAR 0326
Description

This course will focus on the actual drawing process as concept and experimental research as resource. Drawing as the subject matter, drawing context and the actual drawing practice to develop new ways of expression and mixing media, new ways to appropriate the act of drawing. This course is not about drawing “things”, but to encourage students to explore the actual physicality of making a drawing or to question the physical involvement of drawing; to explore existing and reinventing new methods, ideas or processes simultaneously. Through different exercises, in class workshops or given assignments the students can invent and develop a personal language and propose new ideas, make links between media and technologies.

Prerequisites: Sophomore year drawing, advanced drawing skills

Junior Sculpture I

Code
FFAR 0305
Description

This course aims make aware students of certain issues in contemporary sculpture and gives them the technical and conceptual means to develop a more personal language and identity. Students are encouraged to experiment with different approaches, media and concepts and continue to explore technical skills necessary to conceiving and executing sculptural work. Over the course of the semester students are encouraged to develop and pursue a personal sensibility within their artistic research.

Prerequisites : Sophomore Sculpture

Moving Image I

Code
FFAR 0209
Description

The video course is organized as a creative workshop, where students are encouraged to engage quickly in a personal research. A strong involvement is necessary to achieve any 4D project including in class tutorials and independent work.

The first semester will be devoted to technical familiarization with the different filming tools, recording sound and linear editing, in order to acquire spontaneity. The goal for this first term is to develop all the technical skills, and create automatisms to best serve the video practice. Students will be encouraged to use their personal filming tools (smartphones, regular consumer cameras, etc.), as basic as they could seem, to allow a common and natural usage. The collected imagery and sound will serve students all year to build their personal research and artistic proposals.

We will see how different artists create images from three constitutive elements: light, space, and time. We will learn that an image can not be simply reduced to the broadcast visual element, but includes the contextual presentation. We will discuss the importance of the distribution of light and colors in the development of this overall picture, which will introduce the space, set design and the role of the spectator. We will approach the various possible temporal modalities of the image broadcast: real time, delayed linear continuity, disruptive continuity (interactivity, random images, etc.), and their influence on the space and the spectator.

Prerequisite : Foundation Core studios

Studio Elective

Description

You may select an elective from the many course offerings in your department or in other departments with the approval of your department chair.

Artists On Art

Code
FHCA 0305
Description

This course will examine how artists from the mid-19th to the early 21st Centuries conceive of and talk about their own artistic practice. While artists’ works are frequently viewed through the lens of art history or criticism, students will consider how artists present, engage with and develop further levels of inquiry into their work. Topics covered will include artists’ published writings, their notebooks, the artist’s statement versus the manifesto, and their teachings. The course will also offer the opportunity to explore the relationships between artistic identity and art work, ranging from analysis of self-portraits to their performance on screen. Students will discover the extent to which artists’ practice depends upon a critical awareness of the cultural, theoretical, and historical matrix in which they operate. Assignments will include research projects on artists and the preparation of a statement that defines the students’ own self-conception of their studio practice or area of study.

spring

Junior Sculpture II

Code
FFAR 0306
Description

This course aims make aware students of certain issues in contemporary sculpture and gives them the technical and conceptual means to develop a more personal language and identity. Students are encouraged to experiment with different approaches, media and concepts and continue to explore technical skills necessary to conceiving and executing sculptural work. Over the course of the semester students are encouraged to develop and pursue a personal sensibility within their artistic research.

Prerequisites: Sophomore year sculpture/Junior Sculpture1

Content & Container: Reflection On

Code
FFAR 0319
Description

The class is aimed to explore the medium « book » —in all its meanings/forms— focusing on the relationships between the content and the container, the inside and the outside, internal and external structure(s).

A book isn’t content OR shape, but content AND shape. The materiality is part of the project.
In conceiving a « piece » in a book-form, the process has to take in account the permanent dialogue between all the elements composing the whole : texts, images, paper, ink, grids, typeface, chapters, titles, captions, format, size, number of pages… all this gathered in a hierarchy that takes the form of a network.

Starting with the « decomposition » of an existing book, going through the « recomposition » of the existing in a new form, to­—finally— conceive and realize their own « book », students will approach the medium with an apparent technical methodology, which will lead them to discover the —almost endless— richness and complexity of the book structure.

Painting: Interactions II

Code
FFAR 0318
Description

In order to evolve and discover new pictorial horizons painting today must remain open to the possibility of a dialogue with the wide range of multidisciplinary influences that are available. Where once the field of exploration was defined by the rigueur and strict dictates of a formal training,
the strength of painting today lies in its flexibility to use such a training and adapt to the influences of other 2D and 3D disciplines and the pictorial possibilities that they offer as art experience. The possibility to create an art experience through research, experimentation and interaction are the key
components in the junior year in painting. With this as a core component the dynamics of painting are explored through a variety of set projects designed to stimulate the individual imagination.

Prerequisites: Sophomore year painting/Painting Interactions 1

Contemporary Printmaking II

Code
FFAR 0349
Description

This course engages more complex forms of printmaking, such as photo emulsion silk screen, laser lithography and other forms of etching to encourage students to combine printing techniques.
The course will be given in a workshop environment, using water based materials.

Prerequisites: Printmaking 1

Performance/Empathy & Processes

Code
FFAR 0350
Description

An introduction to the concepts and methods of performance art, investing the historical dimensions of ephemeral art, and encouraging students in developing their autonomous practice in this field. The course encourages the presentation and articulation of personal projects and concepts. The course will serve as a platform for articulating, exchange and develop ideas and forms of expression through in class exercises. All aim to enhance individual skills in relation to public appearance/performance and public speech.

Pop & Around

Code
FHCA 0222
Description

The industrial revolution made new forms of technology and mass communication possible, allowing not only for the mechanical reproduction of the image and its circulation on a large scale, but also new materials, new processes, and new media. These developments have had a decisive impact on visual culture, on aesthetic categories, and on the status of the image. The aesthetic revolution began in Montmartre in the 1880s, reached a climax in SoHo in the 1960s, and continues to shape visual culture and aesthetic debates today. What status does the image have? What is the difference between a Brillo box produced by industrial means and one produced by Andy Warhol? Does a distinction between high art and kitsch still matter in the age of Pop? How have the transformations in visual and material culture affected the productive activity of artists, or conversely, how does artists’ activity take up and critically remark upon these transformations? How has the Pop aesthetic translated and transmuted in contemporary global culture? These are the kinds of questions that this course will explore.

Interior Design

fall

Project Communication 1

Code
FINT 0206
Description

These courses (P.C. 1&2) are meant to provide students with the necessary practical skills to describe and represent space. The first semester is dedicated to 2D technical drawing (dimensions, scale, plan, section, elevation views, and axonometric projections) by hand as well as in AutoCAD and the illustration of interior design proposals in Illustrator and Photoshop. In the second semester, students learn the systematic use of perspective sketches and are introduced to digital techniques.

Project Fundamentals 1

Code
FINT 0202
Description

These first project courses (P.F. 1&2) aim at providing students with the cultural and technical tools needed to understand inhabited spaces. Exemplary projects drawn from housing, workplace, leisure and retail environments are investigated. Space elements are analyzed on published architectural projects and within real locations: urban context, masses, negative and positive spaces, lighting, furniture functions. The ability to generate design solutions, select images, color and finishes are emphasized. Building codes and barrier-free design compliance are also be studied.

Materiality

Code
FINT 0204
Description

The course aims at introducing students to the world of materials’ sensorial qualities, requirements, and performances. Students explore the relationships between colors, light and four specific materials (glass, wood, metal and plastics) from a sensorial point of view. Through a theoretical and practical approach of materials and tool technologies, students discover possibilities and ways to apply, combine and assemble materials within interior environments. The course will also encourage critical thinking with regard to an understanding and application of the life cycle analysis, as well as introducing organizations dedicated to sustainability and the rating systems they use. Visits to materials workshops and suppliers showrooms will complement this course.

Project Management

Code
FDMT 0275
Description

This course addresses practical issues of project management. Emphasis is placed on understanding how to create a project plan and manage a team to meet the scope of the project, milestones and deliverables.

Research & Methodology

Code
MDES
Description

Understanding users’ needs, desires and constraints is key to creating any successful system or artefact, such as art installations, games, apps, websites, products, services, etc. Design research methods can be used to understand stakeholder needs, create stakeholder empathy in the creative team, identify opportunities, move beyond obvious solutions, enhance concepts, test and evaluate ideas and guide an individual or a  team from the beginning through final concept evaluation using both quantitative and qualitative research methods. Questionnaire design, participant observation, in-context interviews, self-documentation, participatory design, heuristic analysis, product ethnography and interactive testing using small number statistics are just some of the techniques used to improve concept development and objectively evaluate one concept or design idea over another. We’ll learn how to formulate research topics, use human factors data, gather ethical ethnographic data, use qualitative and quantitative research techniques, analyze the research results and present the information in ways that are appropriate to each stage of the creative process.

spring

Project Communication 2

Code
FINT 0207
Description

These courses (P.C. 1&2) are meant to provide students with the necessary practical skills to describe and represent space. The first semester is dedicated to 2D technical drawing (dimensions, scale, plan, section, elevation views, and axonometric projections) by hand as well as in AutoCAD and the illustration of interior design proposals in Illustrator and Photoshop. In the second semester, students learn the systematic use of perspective sketches and are introduced to digital techniques.

Project Fundamentals 2

Code
FINT 0203
Description

These first project courses (P.F. 1&2) aim at providing students with the cultural and technical tools needed to understand inhabited spaces. Exemplary projects drawn from housing, workplace, leisure and retail environments are investigated. Space elements are analyzed on published architectural projects and within real locations: urban context, masses, negative and positive spaces, lighting, furniture functions. The ability to generate design solutions, select images, color and finishes are emphasized. Building codes and barrier-free design compliance will also be studied.

Architectural Components

Code
FINT 0205
Description

This course aims to introduce and explore the basic components and systems that define the built environment : structure, envelope, floors, walls, roof, stairs, windows, doors, environmental systems (including plumbing, electricity, ventilation, telecommunications, lighting, etc). Over the semester, each session is to address a particular component or system in detail (from exemplary references to technical aspects to graphic representational codes). Sustainability issues and energy-saving systems will also be studied.
The course as a whole intends to provide students with a comprehensive and thorough overview of the numerous aspects and characteristics which need to be considered when developing an interior design project. Bridging with Project Fundamentals 1 & 2, the course will allow students to understand how these components and systems co-exist and interface within the built environment.

The City of Tomorrow

Code
FLIB 3317
Description


The city makes people, and people make the city. A city like Paris is constantly evolving, torn between cherishing its past and inventing its future. How can we interpret a city from its mere observation ? How can we imagine the city of tomorrow by studying how it looks today ? Paris is about to enter a new phase of evolution with the Grand Paris project. The capital of tomorrow will be the result of two main forces : a formally designed process, led by politicians, urbanists, demographs, architects, philosophers etc, and the expression of something informal and hard to foresee, which depends on its inhabitants’ initiatives, feelings, desires. Using ethnographic observation methods, students will carry out field research in different parts of the city (sociological diagnosis of several districts). Once the gathered data has been put together, creating a multi-dimensional vision of Paris, creativity techniques will be applied with the objective to imagine innovative products and services, atmospheres and states of mind that the official builders of Grand Paris should bear in mind. Results could be presented at Designers Days in June.

Lighting Design

Code
FINT 0303
Description

The course aims at helping students to become aware that light is, first of all, a material, a tool to shape spaces, and thus handled and processed as such. Space lighting will be approached from the creative point of view – without it being limited to technological aspects. Students will understand the physiological and psychological aspects of lighting in interior design and will learn to define lighting project intentions in different types of spaces such as an apparel store, an art exhibition space or a restaurant.

Photography

fall

Black & White Photography

Code
FHOT 0218
Description

The medium of photography is largely defined by its history of black and white pictures. The course will cover camera operation, principles of exposure and photographic composition concepts. The goal of this class is to provide a solid foundation of photographic black and white photography skills and techniques. It provides an overview of classic black and white photography while discussing camera techniques that apply to both traditional film and digital cameras. Students will learn how to effectively use their cameras in manual mode and make good quality negatives. The class includes camera and exposure meter instruction, technical lectures, effective scanning methods and instruction on film/digital crossover techniques.

Sophomore Seminar I

Code
FHOT 0230
Description

This seminar addresses both technique and critique. Throughout the semester students will work in the studio and field, recreating the conditions of the working photographer. Technique is at the service of ideas. The development of a personal project will also be required. Students will continue to develop a strong body of work informed by critical readings and discussions. An essential aspect of the seminar is the deepening of visual sensibilities and the discovery of new ways of seeing. Students will work on multiple projects throughout the semester and produce and present a cohesive body of work at the end of the term.

Prerequisites: Semester 1 or equivalent are prerequisites for semester 2.

Digital Photography Lab I

Code
FHOT 0257
Description

This year-long course introduces students to the creative and technical possibilities of digital photography. Through demonstrations and hands-on sessions, students learn the fundamentals of Adobe Photoshop to produce effective digital photographs. Students are taken through all the basic processes encountered in digital workflow, from basic scanning and retouching, image enhancement, and printing fundamentals, to RAW file processing and photographic post-production methods.

Prerequisite(s): Black & White Photography, Introduction to Digital Photography, Digital Skills & Composition or equivalent.

Intro to Digital Photo

Code
FHOT 0207
Description

The emphasis in this fundamental course is the ability to create technically good photographs through proper camera handling and the effective use of simple lighting techniques. Open to all students, this course provides the essential knowledge necessary for any professional image maker, artist or designer in today’s image driven world. Starting with an in-depth understanding of how to maximize the functions of a digital SLR camera, students will be introduced to basic lighting techniques (on-camera and off-camera) in order to maximize the quality of their images. In addition, a component of the course will focus on digital workflow, archiving, retouching and professional output (printing). Through numerous in-class shoots, students will gain first hand experience in producing high-quality images for various purposes such as print or digital portfolios, websites, documentation, promotional material, etc.

Lighting Techniques I

Code
FHOT 0232
Description

This is the first part of a year-long course of learning and mastering the fundamental techniques of studio lighting. The students become familiar with how to create traditional, practical lighting scenarios in a studio environment. Electronic flashes and tungsten lights will be used to achieve control of color, contrast and reflection. Lighting techniques are demonstrated and applied in class to various assignments of tabletop still lifes and portraiture. Emphasis is placed on understanding light and of mastering the technical aspects of the lighting equipment. Assignments will be theme based: headshots, full portraits, and several still lifes.

Prerequisite: Black & White Photography or Introduction to Digital Photography or equivalent.

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Color Photography

Code
FHOT 0211
Description

Students are introduced to basic photography using color materials. Through a year-long study, they learn to master camera controls and film exposure in the format of their choice. Ambient and artificial lighting as well as their impact on various emulsions are examined with an eye towards producing high quality digital color prints, color C-prints and transparencies. Emphasis will be on developing a personal approach and vision using color materials. Exposure to historical antecedents, contemporary readings and criticism are integrated into the course.

Sophomore Seminar II

Code
FHOT 0231
Description

This seminar builds on the Freshman Seminar and further deepens an understanding of photographic practice and theory. Students will continue to develop a strong body of work informed by critical readings and discussions. An essential aspect of the seminar is the deepening of visual sensibilities and the discovery of new ways of seeing. Students will work on multiple projects throughout the semester and produce and present a cohesive body of work at the end of the term.

Prerequisites: Semester 1 or equivalent are prerequisites for semester 2.

Lighting Techniques II

Code
FHOT 0233
Description

Part two of a year-long course of learning and mastering the fundamental techniques of studio lighting. The students become familiar with how to create traditional, practical lighting scenarios in a studio and also in an outdoor environment using multiple light sources while mixing studio electronic flash with outdoor light. Electronic flashes and tungsten lights will be used to achieve control of color, contrast and reflection. Emphasis is placed on understanding light and of mastering the technical aspects of the lighting equipment. Lighting techniques are demonstrated and applied in class to various assignments. The class is project based. The students will choose their projects from several themes: headshot/ portraits, nudes, outdoor flash portraits, and in-class still lifes.

Prerequisite: Lighting Techniques 1

History of Photography

Code
FHCA 0206
Description

Photographers can’t and don’t take pictures at random. Since photography’s invention, the act of photographing has been framed both by the technical realities of the medium and by social and aesthetic traditions. This course will examine some of the major movements and styles in the history of photography, with particular attention to the rich 1880-1970 period. Through study of the pioneering work of key individuals, we will analyze how creative possibilities changed and expanded over time, and how the options and artistic stances we take for granted emerged historically. Each week will focus on a key movement or conceptual innovation, which we will study through image analysis, historical and technical context and the reading of primary texts by photographers and secondary texts by historians or critics. Students will prepare a presentation in which they analyze a body of images by a photographer of their choice and present a series of their own photographs exploring that photographer’s way of working.

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Ofo Oboubi

Certificate in Communication Design
Nationality: Ghanian
Languages: English, Twi (Akans, Ghana) and French

After completing her certificate at PCA, Ofo worked at Christian Louboutin.

I worked as a Graphic Designer for the Visual Merchandising team. This is very different from my independent work because I design according to the brand and what my bosses instruct me. I am gaining so many technical skills and my work process is becoming more and more efficient. I am inspired by the precision, intelligence, and technical know-how that goes with working on this team.

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Leetal Platt

Certificate in Fashion Design
Nationality: American & Israeli
Languages: English, Hebrew & a bit of French

Why did you decide to do the Certificate Program at PCA?

I already have a BFA from NYU in film, and I have dedicated a ton of time and energy to my passion for film production but my sewing hobby began taking on a life of its own, and it became clear that the next step was professional training. However, I didn’t want to go through a whole undergraduate degree program again and found the Certificate program to be an excellent way to “try out” fashion design before applying for fashion jobs or attempting a Masters.

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Lale Taneri

Certificate in Design Management
Nationality: Turkish, British
Languages: English, Turkish, & basic French

What do you love most about Paris?

The bridges, the bakeries and the easiness of getting from one point to another. Also, I love it being a scooter and bicycle friendly city. I love hanging out on the Île Saint-Louis (with some ice-cream) and Grande Mosquée de Paris (with some mint tea).