Certificate Programs

Certificate students have an extraordinary exposure to the art and design world of Paris and come away with new skills and experiences that will enrich their artistic vision and permanently impact their view of the world.

The intensive curriculum of the Paris College of Art certificate programs offers a non-degree option for those wishing to launch a career transition, refine a professional level design portfolio, or prepare for entering a Masters degree program. The certificate programs are ideally suited for the mature student who already has an undergraduate degree and wishes to complete his/her education with a professional art and design concentration. These programs emphasize skill development and provide a solid foundation in the process, technology, and language of art and design.

Working side-by-side with our degree students, certificate students have access to all studio facilities, services and partnerships that the school has to offer.

Students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours for the one-year certificate program. Studying full-time (minimum of 12 credits per semester), certificate students with the guidance of their academic advisor, develop an individualized program specifically catered to their needs and interests.

Certificate Program Curricula

Credits

Communication Design

fall

Typography I

Code
FCMD 0211
Description

For decades, typography has been everywhere. As the art of visual language, typography is inherently communicative. Spoken language is ephemeral and intangible. When written, language is captured in a visual and spatial form, permanent and concrete. Students discover the domain of typography, gain familiarity with typographical language and terms, and learn to work with typefaces for printed matters and digital use. The course will recall the history of typography, from the tradition to contemporary uses and students are introduced to digital typesetting and page layout software.

Graphic Design I

Code
FCMD 0220
Description

This year-long course provides the fundamental skills of graphic design. Students will become familiar with the visual vocabulary that builds graphic design practice through practical projects. Exploring the basic elements (form, colour, type, image and their interconnections) and experimenting on different media and at different scales, the students will become familiar to the graphic design process and visual problem solving.

Motion Graphics

Code
FCMD 0323
Description

This course develops the design methodology and technical skills to produce time-based linear narratives, animations, television graphics, opening credits, music videos, etc. The integration of sound and image is central to the development of motion graphics projects. After Effects and Final Cut are the principal programs taught in this class, along with the language and tools of motion graphics. Students learn to develop concepts and storyboards before commencing their final drafts.

Editorial Design

Code
FCMD 0207
Description

This course will focus on different multi-page documents design, with a particular emphasis on magazines and books (in printed and digital form). Students will acquire the skills to create continuity and variety across a range of pages, present different kind of information in context or appropriate formats, and develop an identity through the pages.

Web Design

Code
FCMD 0330
Description

This junior laboratory/technology studio course focuses on the design process and technical background required for designing effective interactive experiences, with an emphasis on design methodology for evolving systems. HTML, JavaScript, CSS, Flash, and Web 2.0 CMS will be introduced along with specialized web design, imaging and animation tools. Students will design and mock up websites. The second semester delves further into notions of interface design, information architecture and web infrastructure.

Prerequisites: 2D Integrated Studio 1 + 2 or equivalent. Semester 1 or equivalent are prerequisite for semester 2.

Introduction To Visual Culture

Code
FHCA 0340
Description

This interdisciplinary course explores the rise of visual media, communication and information, within the context of a broad cultural shift away from the verbal and textual toward the visual, which has taken place since the advent of photography and cinema in the late 19th century, through the birth of television, to the present proliferation of digital media worldwide. We will consider the critical practices of looking, historicizing and interpreting that have accompanied this ‘visual turn’. Our readings will primarily address the theoretical foundations of the study of visual culture, which is understood to incorporate a variety of visual media and visual technologies: painting and sculpture, scientific imagery, material culture, the internet. If everything can be visual culture, what remains of traditional notions of medium specificity? What critical tools must be invented to analyze visual events from a visual cultural perspective? The relationship between the visual arts and visual media, especially with respect to the ‘global’ contemporary visual landscape, will be a focus of this course.

Studio Elective

Description

You may select an elective from the many course offerings in your department or in other departments with the approval of your department chair.

spring

Typography II

Code
FCMD 0204
Description

The second part of this yearlong course builds on the fundamental typographical forms and functions acquired during Typography 1. The course extends the vocabulary and approaches more complex problems related to typographic hierarchy, context, sequence and scale. A deeper exploration of typography behaves across media will be the opportunity for students to experiment on complex typographical systems, implementing applications in private or public space, environment, or digital time-based projects.

Graphic Design II

Code
FCMD 0221
Description

This year-long course provides the fundamental skills of graphic design. Students will become familiar with the visual vocabulary that builds graphic design practice through practical projects. Exploring the basic elements (form, colour, type, image and their interconnections) and experimenting on different media and at different scales, the students will become familiar to the graphic design process and visual problem solving.

Branding and Identity

Code
FCMD 0350
Description
The course study how brands establish their territory, how they grow, prosper, adapt, evolve, stumble and bounce back. Topics we will explore include: naming, logo design, corporate identity, advertising, marketing, merchandising. During the course, students will approach and discuss how to support the online presence of a brand. At the end of the course students will be able to analyse existing brands, evaluate their performance, and propose repositioning strategies that take into account the latest trends. PREREQUISITES: TYPE: CORE CONCEPT AND DESIGN OR EQUIVALENT

UX Design

Code
FCMD 0236
Description

This studio course requires a basic knowledge of computer graphics and is centered on multimedia authoring software. The focus is authorship, in that more so than a formgiver, the designer acts as a content creator familiar with advanced concepts in interactive multimedia. Students are encouraged to conceptualise, design, prepare and program a multimedia project for eventual publication on the internet.

 

Introduction To Design Studies

Code
FLIB 2212
Description

This course focuses on how design processes, design products, and design discourse are interrelated. It encourages students to reflect and write critically about design and provides them with a foundation in research methods that impact design practice. Readings from leading designers, theorists and historians lead students to situate their own approaches to design within a swiftly changing contemporary context, while visual materials and visits to design-related exhibitions allow them to broaden their base of design references.

Studio Elective

Description

You may select an elective from the many course offerings in your department or in other departments with the approval of your department chair.

Fashion Design

fall

Fashion Drawing I: Hand

Code
FFAS 0205
Description

This course teaches fashion hand drawing techniques mainly from live fashion models; first it will focus on body proportions, body details and body movement to later concentrate on the stylized fashion figure, allowing students to synthesize and create their own ideas.

Students will analyze the behavior of the fabric on the body, how different types of clothing hangs and reacts to movement.
Volume and perspective will be a subject of study through lights-shadow and forth-shortening techniques, which help students to situate their fashion figures in the space and prepare them to design clothes as “soft sculptures”, a bridge from 2D to 3D.

Prerequisites: foundation core studios – semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.

Fashion Research Design Concepts I

Code
FFAS 0210
Description

Students are trained to fully explore and exploit various multi- and interdisciplinary sources in order to creatively apply investigative research to a conceptual design process. Students use sketchbooks as documentary tools and through market research gain awareness of fashion and design products and market categories as well as with current issues in international fashion. The second semester includes different methods and conceptual techniques for implementing effective design directions.

Prerequisites: Foundation core studios – Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.

Pattern Drafting I

Code
FFAS 0297
Description

Students develop an understanding of professional pattern making, metric pattern cutting, and drafting skills. They learn about the architecture of garments and the technical implications of flat construction for the fit and construct basic patterns for skirts, trousers, bodices, dresses, shirts, sleeves, hoods and collars. In the second semester, more advanced methods and techniques are explored. Individual design projects encourage students to experiment with patterns and construct the garments.

Prerequisites: Foundation core studios – Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.

3D Fashion Design I

Code
FFAS 0240
Description

This course introduces the 3D form, fabrics and basic garment construction. Through the practice of draping muslin on the mannequin, fabrics workshops and analysis students learn how 2D materials become 3D forms. The foundation of pattern shapes: bodices, skirts, sleeves, and collars are covered as are essential technical skills and garment assembly techniques. Weekly briefs encourage intensive 3D research and exploration of a variety of methods and techniques. The course initiates a flexible, experimental and critical approach towards materials, volumes, and shapes from which design concepts emanate in an individual, personal, problem-solving process.

Prerequisites: Foundation core studios – Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.

Digital Fashion Studio I

Code
FFAS 0330
Description

This class focuses on digital tools for fashion design and fashion illustration. Students use Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign to prepare concept boards and collection concepts completed with scanned sources and original artwork. Exploring a variety of digital design and presentation methods, students will focus on developing new design concepts for defined niche markets; project briefs will involve research and style analysis of a French couture house or a European luxury brand. Applying digital communication and presentation skills, students will develop a new contemporary vision for an innovative product range and their own graphic identity presented in a professional PowerPoint presentation.

Prerequisites: Sophomore core studios – Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.

spring

Fashion Drawing: Hand II or Digital Fashion Studio II

Description

Fashion Drawing: Hand II

This course teaches fashion hand drawing techniques mainly from live fashion models; first it will focus on body proportions, body details and body movement to later concentrate on the stylized fashion figure, allowing students to synthesize and create their own ideas.
Students will analyze the behavior of the fabric on the body, how different types of clothing hangs and reacts to movement.
Volume and perspective will be a subject of study through lights-shadow and forth-shortening techniques, which help students to situate their fashion figures in the space and prepare them to design clothes as “soft sculptures”, a bridge from 2D to 3D.

Prerequisites: foundation core studios – semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.

Digital Fashion Studio II (FFAS 0331)

This class focuses on digital tools for fashion design and fashion illustration. Students use Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign to prepare concept boards and collection concepts completed with scanned sources and original artwork. Exploring a variety of digital design and presentation methods, students will focus on developing new design concepts for defined niche markets; project briefs will involve research and style analysis of a French couture house or a European luxury brand. Applying digital communication and presentation skills, students will develop a new contemporary vision for an innovative product range and their own graphic identity presented in a professional PowerPoint presentation.

Prerequisites: Sophomore core studios – Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.

Fashion Research and Design Concepts II

Code
FFAS 0211
Description

Students are trained to fully explore and exploit various multi- and interdisciplinary sources in order to creatively apply investigative research to a conceptual design process. Students use sketchbooks as documentary tools and through market research gain awareness of fashion and design products and market categories as well as with current issues in international fashion. The second semester includes different methods and conceptual techniques for implementing effective design directions.

Prerequisites: Foundation core studios – Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.

Pattern Drafting II

Code
FFAS 0298
Description

Students develop an understanding of professional pattern making, metric pattern cutting, and drafting skills. They learn about the architecture of garments and the technical implications of flat construction for the fit and construct basic patterns for skirts, trousers, bodices, dresses, shirts, sleeves, hoods and collars. In the second semester, more advanced methods and techniques are explored. Individual design projects encourage students to experiment with patterns and construct the garments.

Prerequisites: Foundation core studios – Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.

3D Fashion Design II

Code
FFAS 0241
Description

This course introduces the 3D form, fabrics and basic garment construction. Through the practice of draping muslin on the mannequin, fabrics workshops and analysis students learn how 2D materials become 3D forms. The foundation of pattern shapes: bodices, skirts, sleeves, and collars are covered as are essential technical skills and garment assembly techniques. Weekly briefs encourage intensive 3D research and exploration of a variety of methods and techniques. The course initiates a flexible, experimental and critical approach towards materials, volumes, and shapes from which design concepts emanate in an individual, personal, problem-solving process.

Prerequisites: Foundation core studios – Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.

Fashion Reality

Code
FFAS-0215
Description

This course is a series of workshop to build necessary skills for any student wishing to work in the fashion industry, from developing a business plan, to building a collection, to forecasting trends, etc. Different professionals will come in to deliver intensive workshop format sessions over the course of a semester. This course is open to non-fashion studio major who are interested in the fashion industry but do not have technical sewing, patterning, etc. skills.

Fine Arts

fall

Painting: Interactions I

Code
FFAR 0317
Description

In order to evolve and discover new pictorial horizons painting today must remain open to the possibility of a dialogue with the wide range of multidisciplinary influences that are available. Where once the field of exploration was defined by the rigueur and strict dictates of a formal training.

The strength of painting today lies in its flexibility to use such training and adapt to the influences of other 2D and 3D disciplines and the pictorial possibilities that they offer as art experience. The possibility to create an art experience through research, experimentation and interaction are the key components in the junior year in painting. With this as a core component the dynamics of painting are explored through a variety of set projects designed to stimulate the individual imagination.

Prerequisites: Sophomore year painting

Junior Sculpture I

Code
FFAR 0305
Description

This course aims make aware students of certain issues in contemporary sculpture and gives them the technical and conceptual means to develop a more personal language and identity. Students are encouraged to experiment with different approaches, media and concepts and continue to explore technical skills necessary to conceiving and executing sculptural work. Over the course of the semester students are encouraged to develop and pursue a personal sensibility within their artistic research.

Prerequisites : Sophomore Sculpture

Studio Elective

Description

You may select an elective from the many course offerings in your department or in other departments with the approval of your department chair.

Introduction to Visual Culture

Description

This interdisciplinary course explores the rise of visual media, communication and information, within the context of a broad cultural shift away from the verbal and textual toward the visual, which has taken place since the advent of photography and cinema in the late 19th century, through the birth of television, to the present proliferation of digital media worldwide. We will consider the critical practices of looking, historicizing and interpreting that have accompanied this ‘visual turn’. Our readings will primarily address the theoretical foundations of the study of visual culture, which is understood to incorporate a variety of visual media and visual technologies: painting and sculpture, scientific imagery, material culture, the internet. If everything can be visual culture, what remains of traditional notions of medium specificity? What critical tools must be invented to analyze visual events from a visual cultural perspective? The relationship between the visual arts and visual media, especially with respect to the ‘global’ contemporary visual landscape, will be a focus of this course.

Departmental Electives

Description

You may select an elective from the many course offerings in your department or in other departments with the approval of your department chair.

spring

Junior Sculpture II

Code
FFAR 0306
Description

This course aims make aware students of certain issues in contemporary sculpture and gives them the technical and conceptual means to develop a more personal language and identity. Students are encouraged to experiment with different approaches, media and concepts and continue to explore technical skills necessary to conceiving and executing sculptural work. Over the course of the semester students are encouraged to develop and pursue a personal sensibility within their artistic research.

Prerequisites: Sophomore year sculpture/Junior Sculpture1

Painting: Interactions II

Code
FFAR 0318
Description

In order to evolve and discover new pictorial horizons painting today must remain open to the possibility of a dialogue with the wide range of multidisciplinary influences that are available. Where once the field of exploration was defined by the rigueur and strict dictates of a formal training,
the strength of painting today lies in its flexibility to use such a training and adapt to the influences of other 2D and 3D disciplines and the pictorial possibilities that they offer as art experience. The possibility to create an art experience through research, experimentation and interaction are the key
components in the junior year in painting. With this as a core component the dynamics of painting are explored through a variety of set projects designed to stimulate the individual imagination.

Prerequisites: Sophomore year painting/Painting Interactions 1

Contemporary Printmaking II

Code
FFAR 0349
Description

This course engages more complex forms of printmaking, such as photo emulsion silk screen, laser lithography and other forms of etching to encourage students to combine printing techniques.
The course will be given in a workshop environment, using water based materials.

Prerequisites: Printmaking 1

Creative & Experimental Drawing

Code
FFAR 0326
Description

This course will focus on the actual drawing process as concept and experimental research as resource. Drawing as the subject matter, drawing context and the actual drawing practice to develop new ways of expression and mixing media, new ways to appropriate the act of drawing. This course is not about drawing “things”, but to encourage students to explore the actual physicality of making a drawing or to question the physical involvement of drawing; to explore existing and reinventing new methods, ideas or processes simultaneously. Through different exercises, in class workshops or given assignments the students can invent and develop a personal language and propose new ideas, make links between media and technologies.

Prerequisites: Sophomore year drawing, advanced drawing skills

Performance

Code
FFAR 0358
Description

This course will explore performance as a way to embody all artistic practices, as well as consider this particular medium as a resource, extension, or another expanded form. The course encourages cross-disciplinary exploration and the development of personal projects. Introducing the methodology and tools necessary to support performance with the aim to enhance individual skills in relation to performing and public presentation.

Fields as varied as music, science, or literature can be drawn on to develop unique performance practices.

Interior Design

fall

Project Fundamentals 1

Code
FINT 0202
Description

These first project courses (P.F. 1&2) aim to establish the inherent principles that structure space from a sensorial and a practical point of view. The course will provide students with the cultural and technical tools needed to understand inhabited spaces. Exemplary projects drawn from housing, workplace, leisure and retail environments are investigated, while addressing building codes and conventions. Students will learn how to elaborate and develop clear ideas and conceptual principles, while considering urban context, space organization, negative and positive spaces, lighting and furniture functions. The ability to generate design solutions, select materials, color and finishes are emphasized.

Materiality

Code
FINT 0204
Description

The course aims at introducing students to the world of materials’ sensorial qualities, requirements, and performances. Students explore the relationships between colors, light and four specific materials (glass, wood, metal and plastics) from a sensorial point of view. Through a theoretical and practical approach of materials and tool technologies, students discover possibilities and ways to apply, combine and assemble materials within interior environments. The course will also encourage critical thinking with regard to an understanding and application of the life cycle analysis, as well as introducing organizations dedicated to sustainability and the rating systems they use. Visits to materials workshops and suppliers showrooms will complement this course.

Project Management

Code
FDMT 0275
Description

This course addresses practical issues of project management. Emphasis is placed on understanding how to create a project plan and manage a team to meet the scope of the project, milestones and deliverables.

History of Architecture and Interiors

Code
MINT 0506
Description

This course explores the flourishing theoretical debate around architecture and design in the Modern Era. By providing students with the knowledge and skills required to understand and analyze their built environment, we will focus on significant periods that have marked architecture in Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries. Starting from the industrial revolution, the course will cover the prevailing theoretical movements that have characterized and formed Modern Architectural History.

By adopting Paris as a paradigmatic area of study, students will be first introduced to the redefinition of a “National Style” in 1840ies France while focusing on the interpretation of history in contemporary architectural language. Students will then look into emerging artists and building forms in North America and Europe starting with the School of Chicago and moving forward with the Arts & Crafts, and Art Nouveau movements, together with the Prairie School. Students will be also introduced to the influential Avant-garde schools such as the Art Déco and Bauhaus before approaching the International Style. Although the course offers a diachronic approach of History, Architecture and interior design will be also tackled through a thematic analysis with a series of exercises (In-class activities; field trips and visual analysis) where students will assess, explore and compare built structures in our urban environment.

Introduction to Project Communication

Code
FINT (02XX)
Description

This course is intended as an introduction to the communication of interior design projects. It is meant to provide students with a basic understanding of practical skills used to describe and represent space. Through a series of tasks, students familiarize themselves with basic design tools – conceptual sketches, study models, two dimensional drawings, volumetric representations and presentation techniques – which accompany the elaboration and communication of interior design proposals.

spring

Project Communication 2D

Code
FINT 0206
Description

This first course in Project Communication is meant to provide students with the necessary practical skills to describe and represent space in two dimensions. The semester is dedicated to 2D technical drawing (dimensions, scale, plan, section, elevation views, and axonometric projections) by hand as well as in AutoCAD and the illustration of interior design proposals in Illustrator and Photoshop, with an understanding of their application as both powerful conceptual and presentation tools.

Project Fundamentals 2

Code
FINT 0203
Description

These first project courses (P.F. 1&2) aim to establish the inherent principles that structure space from a sensorial and a practical point of view. The course will provide students with the cultural and technical tools needed to understand inhabited spaces. Exemplary projects drawn from housing, workplace, leisure and retail environments are investigated, while addressing building codes and conventions. Students will learn how to elaborate and develop clear ideas and conceptual principles, while considering urban context, space organization, negative and positive spaces, lighting and furniture functions. The ability to generate design solutions, select materials, color and finishes are emphasized.

 

Architectural Components

Code
FINT 0205
Description

This course aims to introduce and explore the basic components and systems that define the built environment : structure, envelope, floors, walls, roof, stairs, windows, doors, environmental systems (including plumbing, electricity, ventilation, telecommunications, lighting, etc). Over the semester, each session is to address a particular component or system in detail (from exemplary references to technical aspects to graphic representational codes). Sustainability issues and energy-saving systems will also be studied.
The course as a whole intends to provide students with a comprehensive and thorough overview of the numerous aspects and characteristics which need to be considered when developing an interior design project. Bridging with Project Fundamentals 1 & 2, the course will allow students to understand how these components and systems co-exist and interface within the built environment.

Lighting Design

Code
FINT 0303
Description

The course aims at helping students to become aware that light is, first of all, a material, a tool to shape spaces, and thus handled and processed as such. Space lighting will be approached from the creative point of view – without it being limited to technological aspects. Students will understand the physiological and psychological aspects of lighting in interior design and will learn to define lighting project intentions in different types of spaces such as an apparel store, an art exhibition space or a restaurant.

Portfolio Preparation

Code
FINT 04XX
Description

Intensive workshops dedicated to the experimentation of various techniques provided for students: they will be able to choose how to present their final individual project and their print and digital portfolios for further career or education prospects.

Photography

fall

Black & White Photography

Code
FHOT 0218
Description

The medium of photography is largely defined by its history of black and white pictures. The course will cover camera operation, principles of exposure and photographic composition concepts. The goal of this class is to provide a solid foundation of photographic black and white photography skills and techniques. It provides an overview of classic black and white photography while discussing camera techniques that apply to both traditional film and digital cameras. Students will learn how to effectively use their cameras in manual mode and make good quality negatives. The class includes camera and exposure meter instruction, technical lectures, effective scanning methods and instruction on film/digital crossover techniques.

Sophomore Seminar I

Code
FHOT 0230
Description

This is a year-long course building on the Freshman year, the course addresses the creative process as well as technique and critique. Through select readings, field trips to galleries and museum exhibitions, screenings of film clips and viewing of historical and contemporary artists’ work, students will have the opportunity to develop their artistic reference points as they delve into the production of their own personal projects. Students will be expected to engage in class discussions and group critiques, keep a journal and will be encouraged to experiment outside their comfort zones as they begin to think along conceptual as well aesthetic and formal frameworks, examining problems and trying different approaches to find a solution. Throughout the semester students will work in the studio and/or field in order to create a personal project (12-16 final images in total) that is both formally and conceptually coherent. Possible subjects may fall under themes of environmental portraiture, photographic appropriation or collage, and Fine Art photography inspired by history or geography. The student can also create her/his own personal theme that is not listed here as long as it is agreed upon in class. Finally, students will begin developing their artist statements as they clarify their vision.

Digital Photography Lab

Code
FHOT 0257
Description

This course introduces students to the creative and technical possibilities of digital photography. Through demonstrations and hands-on sessions, students learn the fundamentals of Adobe Photoshop to produce effective digital photographs. Students are taken through all the basic processes encountered in digital workflow, from basic scanning and retouching, image enhancement, and printing fundamentals, to RAW file processing and photographic post-production methods.

Prerequisite(s): Black & White Photography, Introduction to Digital Photography, Digital Skills & Composition or equivalent.

Intro to Digital Photo

Code
FHOT 0207
Description

The emphasis in this fundamental course is the ability to create technically good photographs through proper camera handling and the effective use of simple lighting techniques. Open to all students, this course provides the essential knowledge necessary for any professional image maker, artist or designer in today’s image driven world. Starting with an in-depth understanding of how to maximize the functions of a digital SLR camera, students will be introduced to basic lighting techniques (on-camera and off-camera) in order to maximize the quality of their images. In addition, a component of the course will focus on digital workflow, archiving, retouching and professional output (printing). Through numerous in-class shoots, students will gain first hand experience in producing high-quality images for various purposes such as print or digital portfolios, websites, documentation, promotional material, etc.

Lighting Techniques I

Code
FHOT 0232
Description

This is the first part of a yearlong course of learning and mastering the fundamental techniques of studio lighting. The students become familiar with how to create traditional, practical lighting scenarios in a studio environment. Electronic flashes and tungsten lights will be used to achieve control of color, contrast, and reflection. Lighting techniques are demonstrated and applied in class to various assignments of tabletop still lifes and portraiture. Emphasis is placed on understanding light and of mastering the technical aspects of the lighting equipment. Assignments will be theme based: headshots, full portraits, and several still lifes.

Prerequisite: Black & White Photography or Introduction to Digital Photography or equivalent.

spring

Color Photography

Code
FHOT 0211
Description

Students are introduced to basic photography using color materials. Through a year-long study, they learn to master camera controls and film exposure in the format of their choice. Ambient and artificial lighting as well as their impact on various emulsions are examined with an eye towards producing high quality digital color prints, color C-prints and transparencies. Emphasis will be on developing a personal approach and vision using color materials. Exposure to historical antecedents, contemporary readings and criticism are integrated into the course.

Sophomore Seminar II

Code
FHOT 0231
Description

This is a year-long course building on the Freshman year, the course addresses the creative process as well as technique and critique. Through select readings, field trips to galleries and museum exhibitions, screenings of film clips and viewing of historical and contemporary artists’ work, students will have the opportunity to develop their artistic reference points as they delve into the production of their own personal projects. Students will be expected to engage in class discussions and group critiques, keep a journal and will be encouraged to experiment outside their comfort zones as they begin to think along conceptual as well aesthetic and formal frameworks, examining problems and trying different approaches to find a solution. Throughout the semester students will work in the studio and/or field in order to create a personal project (12-16 final images in total) that is both formally and conceptually coherent. Possible subjects may fall under themes of environmental portraiture, photographic appropriation or collage, and Fine Art photography inspired by history or geography. The student can also create her/his own personal theme that is not listed here as long as it is agreed upon in class. Finally, students will begin developing their artist statements as they clarify their vision.

Prerequisites: Semester 1 or equivalent are prerequisites for semester 2.

Lighting Techniques II

Code
FHOT 0233
Description

This is the second part of a yearlong course of learning and mastering the fundamental techniques of studio lighting. The students become familiar with how to create traditional, practical lighting scenarios in a studio and also in an outdoor environment using multiple light sources while mixing studio electronic flash with outdoor light. Electronic flashes and tungsten lights will be used to achieve control of color, contrast and reflection. Emphasis is placed on understanding light and of mastering the technical aspects of the lighting equipment. Lighting techniques are demonstrated and applied in class to various assignments. The class is project based. The students will choose their projects from several themes: headshot/ portraits, nudes, outdoor flash portraits, and in-class still life.

Prerequisite: Lighting Techniques 1

History of Photography

Code
FHCA 0206
Description

Photographers can’t and don’t take pictures at random. Since photography’s invention, the act of photographing has been framed both by the technical realities of the medium and by social and aesthetic traditions. This course will examine some of the major movements and styles in the history of photography, with particular attention to the rich 1880-1970 period. Through study of the pioneering work of key individuals, we will analyze how creative possibilities changed and expanded over time, and how the options and artistic stances we take for granted emerged historically. Each week will focus on a key movement or conceptual innovation, which we will study through image analysis, historical and technical context and the reading of primary texts by photographers and secondary texts by historians or critics. Students will prepare a presentation in which they analyze a body of images by a photographer of their choice and present a series of their own photographs exploring that photographer’s way of working.

ofo

Ofo Oboubi

Certificate in Communication Design
Nationality: Ghanian
Languages: English, Twi (Akans, Ghana) and French

After completing her certificate at PCA, Ofo worked at Christian Louboutin.

I worked as a Graphic Designer for the Visual Merchandising team. This is very different from my independent work because I design according to the brand and what my bosses instruct me. I am gaining so many technical skills and my work process is becoming more and more efficient. I am inspired by the precision, intelligence, and technical know-how that goes with working on this team.

beolitik-oc5_1272-leetalplatt-rvb-web

Leetal Platt

Certificate in Fashion Design
Nationality: American & Israeli
Languages: English, Hebrew & a bit of French

Why did you decide to do the Certificate Program at PCA?

I already have a BFA from NYU in film, and I have dedicated a ton of time and energy to my passion for film production but my sewing hobby began taking on a life of its own, and it became clear that the next step was professional training. However, I didn’t want to go through a whole undergraduate degree program again and found the Certificate program to be an excellent way to “try out” fashion design before applying for fashion jobs or attempting a Masters.