Transdisciplinary New Media

Master of Arts /
Master of Fine Arts
in Transdisciplinary New Media

Production of new media is no longer the province of individual artists or designers working by themselves, but rather involves the collaborative practice of multidisciplinary teams.

Designed for those who are interested in exploring the wide-ranging creative field of New Media that goes beyond traditionally defined art and design disciplines, this program employs methods of transdisciplinary practice through collaborative teamwork. Through a shared creative process, students will re-frame their current understanding of different tools, technologies, theories, and methods, developing hybrid systems and solutions that go beyond any one discipline.

At PCA, students can complete either a Masters of Art (MA) or a Masters of Fine Arts (MFA) in Transdisciplinary New Media. The first two semesters (fall and spring) of these programs follow a common curriculum. MA students complete their thesis in the spring term to receive their degree while MFA students continue for two semesters of study in the following academic year (fall and spring) to receive their degree.

Graduates of both the MA and MFA will go on to apply their skills to collaborative projects in domains as varied as online and traditional publishing, video games, art installations, exhibitions, live performances, web design, interaction/interface design, software development, service design, etc. As well, the MFA, which is considered a terminal degree in this field, will open the doors to teaching opportunities in higher education for our graduates.

The program is open to any applicant who has successfully completed an undergraduate degree (BFA, BA, BSc, BID, BArch, etc.). To encourage this transdisciplinary approach, candidates from varied backgrounds-including art, design, programming, business, literature, philosophy, science, music and theory-are actively encouraged to apply. Because we want to encourage students with varied skill sets and perspectives some students may be required to take preparatory summer undergraduate courses or pre-requisites: applicants without a BFA are required to have at least two semesters of Art or Design History; applicants with non-technical backgrounds will be required to attend a summer or online course prior to enrollment to shore up skills that may otherwise be lacking (Video, Web (HTML, CSS, PHP), and Processing).

Faculty

Klaus Fruchtnis

Klaus Fruchtnis

Associate Dean of Graduate Studies
de_bie-martin

Martin De Bie

Adjunct Faculty
Abad, Donald

Donald Abad

Adjunct Faculty
cruz

Filipa Cruz

Adjunct Faculty
Linda Jarvin copy

Linda Jarvin

Chief Academic Officer
Ianis Lallemand

Ianis Lallemand

Adjunct Faculty
Soliman Lopez

Solimán López

Adjunct Faculty
Lisa Salamandra

Lisa Salamandra

Adjunct Faculty
Aleksandra_Smilek

Aleksandra Smilek

Adjunct Faculty
Gökce, Taskan

Gökce Taskan

Adjunct Faculty
Miyo Van Stenis

Miyö Van Stenis

Adjunct Faculty
Joanna WLASZYN

Joanna Wlaszyn

Adjunct Faculty
Keithley P. Woolward

Keithley P. Woolward

Adjunct Faculty

MA Curriculum

Credits

One-year program

fall

Creativity and Technology

Code
MTNM 0501
Description

Students draw upon their previous knowledge and experience to contribute to the collaborative process. Projects are set to test preconceived ideas and the limits of students’ understanding. The course emphasizes computer use for artistic creation and research. Overview of image making and time-based media within the broad context of contemporary art, new media art, and mediated culture. During the semester, students will explore digital software and hardware tools, digital artists, art history, and conceptual thinking to develop own skills and create project work culled from these resources.

The course includes a series of workshops, readings, and exercises that give students conceptual and technical skills to develop their own projects

Digital Media and Technology I

Code
MTNM 0502
Description

This course will introduce students to digital design and fabrication techniques within the context of contemporary art and design. The hands-on course will assist students in nurturing the ability to efficiently translate ideas and concepts into digitally produced physical objects. Students will be given the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to maintain, calibrate and troubleshoot equipment in a fabrication lab as well as learn what it takes to keep a lab in operation. Students will be given the opportunity to create objects utilizing industrial laser cutters, 3D digital modeling, 3D digital scanning, and 3D printing. We will consider digital fabrication and its role in the localization and production of global goods and explore its impact on the commodification of the art object. At such early stages of digital fabrication, students can take on great roles in fostering the development of alternative materials, the creation of more efficient digital production as well as the abstraction and deconstruction of the many digital fabrication processes. The class will include three assignments to create projects using the three machines (laser, 3D) and the opportunity to work on a final project.

History of New Media

Code
FHCA 0326
Description

History of New Media is an overview of the pioneering artists and scientists who have brought about the dissolution of boundaries that have traditionally existed between the artistic and technological disciplines. The course will survey the work and ideas of artists who have explored new interactive and interdisciplinary forms, as well as engineers and mathematicians who have developed information technologies and influential scientific and philosophical ideologies that have influenced the arts. The course begins with seminal artistic movements and genres as well as the study of the invention of information technologies and new human-machine paradigms that have come to define digital culture. This broad historical analysis will help illuminate an understanding of the emerging digital arts and its aesthetics, strategies, trends, and socio-cultural aspirations. Central to this analysis will be an understanding of key concepts for the interpretation of evolving multimedia forms: including integration, interactivity, hypermedia, immersion, and narrativity. The course will reveal how these primary elements of contemporary media have roots in experimental electronic and performance art prior to the digital era. Students will develop commentary in the form of critical projects through in-depth analysis of historical trends and seminal work in the media arts and information sciences.

Masters Electives

Description

You may select an elective from the many course offerings in your department or in other departments with the approval of your department chair.

  • French
  • Drawing Technology and Perception
  • Advanced Printmaking*
  • Intellectual Property Rights
  • Concept Development Storytelling
  • Photography as Installation*
  • Photography in the Expanded Field*
  • History of New Media*
  • Designer’s Ethical and Social Responsibility
  • Educational Principles
  • Alternative Processes Image-Making*
  • Digital Fabrication Design
  • The Art of Code I & II
  • 4D Studio I & II*
  • The Fashion Editorial
  • Design Thinking
  • Social Entrepreneurship
  • Project Management*

* Undergraduate level courses

 

spring

Collaboration and Technology

Code
MTNM 0504
Description

The class encourages a questioning collaborative practice. Students are expected to rethink their experience/practice by working through projects designed to test definitions and boundaries between disciplines. New forms of working and thinking will be developed through a consideration of ‘technology’ in its widest sense, from digital-screen-based work to experiential and auditory proposals. Through a shared creative process students will challenge their understanding of different tools and methods, developing hybrid systems and solutions that go beyond any one discipline. Students will engage in critical reflection of their relationship to the group, contextualizing their experience through theories of the collaborative role and situating their emerging practice in relation to the professional world. Masterclasses with practitioners who explore the possibilities of multi-media practice will provide students direct access to knowledge and hands-on experience of the most current and challenging ideas.

The course includes a series of workshops, readings, and exercises that give students conceptual and technical skills to develop their own projects.

Digital Media and Technology II

Code
MTNM 0505
Description

This course focuses on achieving core competency in a wide variety of new media technologies. Closely linked to the studio class, students are expected to put into practice the theories and methodologies presented in other core classes, but the focus is on developing technical skills and a thorough understanding the working processes of each specialization. Technology is defined in the widest sense possible – not just screen-based, digital technology, but also mechanical, chemical, auditory, experiential, etc. – since the hybridization of “low tech” and “high tech” often produce powerful emotional experiences – familiar yet awe-inspiring at the same time.

Each New (Digital) Media and Technology class builds on its predecessor, so that over 2 semesters, students have had an opportunity to be introduced to a wide variety of tools and techniques. Every student attempts every technique, not just to appreciate the difficulties of mastering a technology, but also to understand the core knowledge that a collaborative expert can bring to the table. Students with high competency in a topic will co-teach that segment, introducing them to the world of education, increasing their understanding of their collaborative contribution/potential, and improving their communication skills.

Marketplace for Art and Design

Description

This course will introduce and outline the role, purpose, and perception of « art » and « design » in various marketplaces and contexts for the emerging arts entrepreneur. Topics include issues in marketing aesthetic products, case studies on art fairs, art institutions and cultural events, models of consumer behavior, art, and technology, macro-economic issues that affect the arts industries, arts policy, and access, art-as-business, design in the international context, merchandising, difficulties and the impact of the various business environments on art and design disciplines.

Professional Networking Series

Code
MINT 0511
Description

Professionals from the Parisian art and design world will come in to introduce students to their professional practice and engage them in practical exercises preparing them for the job market. Instructors will be drawn from a broad range of fields: photographers and videographers; designer and architects; galleries, museums, auction houses and private collections; art fairs and international exhibitions; art dealers; curators; historians; journalists and iconographers; artists; magazine editors; I.P. and licensing lawyers, etc. This class brings together students from all the graduate programs.

Masters Electives

Description

You may select an elective from the many course offerings in your department or in other departments with the approval of your department chair.

  • French
  • Drawing Technology and Perception
  • Advanced Printmaking*
  • Intellectual Property Rights
  • Concept Development Storytelling
  • Photography as Installation*
  • Photography in the Expanded Field*
  • History of New Media*
  • Designer’s Ethical and Social Responsibility
  • Educational Principles
  • Alternative Processes Image-Making*
  • Digital Fabrication Design
  • The Art of Code I & II
  • 4D Studio I & II*
  • The Fashion Editorial
  • Design Thinking
  • Social Entrepreneurship
  • Project Management*

* Undergraduate level courses

 

Overall Credits Total
30

MFA Curriculum

Credits

Year One

fall

Creativity and Technology

Code
MTNM 0501
Description

Students draw upon their previous knowledge and experience to contribute to the collaborative process. Projects are set to test preconceived ideas and the limits of students’ understanding. The course emphasizes computer use for artistic creation and research. Overview of image making and time-based media within the broad context of contemporary art, new media art, and mediated culture. During the semester, students will explore digital software and hardware tools, digital artists, art history, and conceptual thinking to develop own skills and create project work culled from these resources.

The course includes a series of workshops, readings, and exercises that give students conceptual and technical skills to develop their own projects

Digital Media and Technology I

Code
MTNM 0502
Description

This course will introduce students to digital design and fabrication techniques within the context of contemporary art and design. The hands-on course will assist students in nurturing the ability to efficiently translate ideas and concepts into digitally produced physical objects. Students will be given the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to maintain, calibrate and troubleshoot equipment in a fabrication lab as well as learn what it takes to keep a lab in operation. Students will be given the opportunity to create objects utilizing industrial laser cutters, 3D digital modeling, 3D digital scanning, and 3D printing. We will consider digital fabrication and its role in the localization and production of global goods and explore its impact on the commodification of the art object. At such early stages of digital fabrication, students can take on great roles in fostering the development of alternative materials, the creation of more efficient digital production as well as the abstraction and deconstruction of the many digital fabrication processes. The class will include three assignments to create projects using the three machines (laser, 3D) and the opportunity to work on a final project.

Introduction to Research & Methodology

Description

The course provides introductory-to-advanced-level research and methodology instruction, covering topics from art and design theory to the use of technology. This course focuses in depth on various research methods currently used to inform the design process. It builds on knowledge and skills acquired in the first semester to introduce students to specific research methods for designers and artists. The course will cover research in physical human factors; human cognitive factors; cultural human factors; and ethnographic fieldwork. Students will learn how to apply these methods to the design process through hands-on projects requiring a multidisciplinary approach.

In this section, students will be introduced to the basic tenets of research in order to support their reasoning with respect to the design process. Foremost, they will learn to formulate a design research problematic; engage in data gathering and analysis; differentiate between primary and secondary research sources; carry out quantitative and qualitative research.

History of New Media

Code
FHCA 0326
Description

History of New Media is an overview of the pioneering artists and scientists who have brought about the dissolution of boundaries that have traditionally existed between the artistic and technological disciplines. The course will survey the work and ideas of artists who have explored new interactive and interdisciplinary forms, as well as engineers and mathematicians who have developed information technologies and influential scientific and philosophical ideologies that have influenced the arts. The course begins with seminal artistic movements and genres as well as the study of the invention of information technologies and new human-machine paradigms that have come to define digital culture. This broad historical analysis will help illuminate an understanding of the emerging digital arts and its aesthetics, strategies, trends, and socio-cultural aspirations. Central to this analysis will be an understanding of key concepts for the interpretation of evolving multimedia forms: including integration, interactivity, hypermedia, immersion, and narrativity. The course will reveal how these primary elements of contemporary media have roots in experimental electronic and performance art prior to the digital era. Students will develop commentary in the form of critical projects through in-depth analysis of historical trends and seminal work in the media arts and information sciences.

Masters Electives

Description

You may select an elective from the many course offerings in your department or in other departments with the approval of your department chair.

  • French
  • Drawing Technology and Perception
  • Advanced Printmaking*
  • Intellectual Property Rights
  • Concept Development Storytelling
  • Photography as Installation*
  • Photography in the Expanded Field*
  • History of New Media*
  • Designer’s Ethical and Social Responsibility
  • Educational Principles
  • Alternative Processes Image-Making*
  • Digital Fabrication Design
  • The Art of Code I & II
  • 4D Studio I & II*
  • The Fashion Editorial
  • Design Thinking
  • Social Entrepreneurship
  • Project Management*

* Undergraduate level courses

 

spring

Collaboration and Technology

Code
MTNM 0504
Description

The class encourages a questioning collaborative practice. Students are expected to rethink their experience/practice by working through projects designed to test definitions and boundaries between disciplines. New forms of working and thinking will be developed through a consideration of ‘technology’ in its widest sense, from digital-screen-based work to experiential and auditory proposals. Through a shared creative process students will challenge their understanding of different tools and methods, developing hybrid systems and solutions that go beyond any one discipline. Students will engage in critical reflection of their relationship to the group, contextualizing their experience through theories of the collaborative role and situating their emerging practice in relation to the professional world. Masterclasses with practitioners who explore the possibilities of multi-media practice will provide students direct access to knowledge and hands-on experience of the most current and challenging ideas.

The course includes a series of workshops, readings, and exercises that give students conceptual and technical skills to develop their own projects.

Digital Media and Technology II

Code
MTNM 0505
Description

This course focuses on achieving core competency in a wide variety of new media technologies. Closely linked to the studio class, students are expected to put into practice the theories and methodologies presented in other core classes, but the focus is on developing technical skills and a thorough understanding the working processes of each specialization. Technology is defined in the widest sense possible – not just screen-based, digital technology, but also mechanical, chemical, auditory, experiential, etc. – since the hybridization of “low tech” and “high tech” often produce powerful emotional experiences – familiar yet awe-inspiring at the same time.

Each New (Digital) Media and Technology class builds on its predecessor, so that over 2 semesters, students have had an opportunity to be introduced to a wide variety of tools and techniques. Every student attempts every technique, not just to appreciate the difficulties of mastering a technology, but also to understand the core knowledge that a collaborative expert can bring to the table. Students with high competency in a topic will co-teach that segment, introducing them to the world of education, increasing their understanding of their collaborative contribution/potential, and improving their communication skills.

Intermediate Research & Methodology

Description

The course provides introductory-to-advanced-level research and methodology instruction, covering topics from art and design theory to the use of technology. This course focuses in depth on various research methods currently used to inform the design process. It builds on knowledge and skills acquired in the first semester to introduce students to specific research methods for designers and artists. The course will cover research in physical human factors; human cognitive factors; cultural human factors; and ethnographic fieldwork. Students will learn how to apply these methods to the design process through hands-on projects requiring a multidisciplinary approach.

Masters Electives

Description

You may select an elective from the many course offerings in your department or in other departments with the approval of your department chair.

  • French
  • Drawing Technology and Perception
  • Advanced Printmaking*
  • Intellectual Property Rights
  • Concept Development Storytelling
  • Photography as Installation*
  • Photography in the Expanded Field*
  • History of New Media*
  • Designer’s Ethical and Social Responsibility
  • Educational Principles
  • Alternative Processes Image-Making*
  • Digital Fabrication Design
  • The Art of Code I & II
  • 4D Studio I & II*
  • The Fashion Editorial
  • Design Thinking
  • Social Entrepreneurship
  • Project Management*

* Undergraduate level courses

 

Year Two

fall

Critical Practice and Technology I

Code
MTNM 0507
Description

This is a year-long course building on the degree project. Projects at this stage will be designed and realized independently by the group with an advanced level of understanding and ambition. The course emphasizes intellectual, creative and technical growth. Coursework exposes students to a wide variety of New Media Art practices ranging from time-based to interactive and installations. Students are empowered through the development of self-discipline, cultural awareness, and personal voice.

The course includes a series of workshops, readings, and exercises that give students conceptual and technical skills to develop their own projects.

Digital Media and Technology III

Code
MTNM 0508
Description

Advanced phase: students are introduced to iterative design processes, pervasive application programming, clusters, and peripherals. Each New Media and Technology class builds on its predecessor, so that over 3 semesters, students have had an opportunity to be introduced to a wide variety of tools and techniques. Every student attempts every technique, not just to appreciate the difficulties of mastering a technology, but also to understand the core knowledge that a collaborative expert can bring to the table. Students with high competency in a topic will co-teach that segment, introducing them to the world of education, increasing their understanding of their collaborative contribution/potential, and improving their communication skills.

This course offers a critical introduction to new (digital) media and technology, focusing on the relationship between “old” and “new” media and emphasizing both the cultural meanings of media in general and media as pedagogy. This course gives the chance to observe, participate, and explore new media literacy, learning, and making across formal and informal learning settings. This is not a course about technology; rather, it is a course about the activity-the doing, the participatory culture-that surrounds new media, the use and the learning born through that activity. During the course, a number of guests will join to discuss their work in new media.

MFA Thesis

Description

Building on the research, critical thinking and writing skills developed in the first three semesters of the seminar, in the final semester, each student will be responsible for the production of a 40 to-60 page thesis paper and the corresponding body of work, culminating in a public exhibition or conference. For their final paper, each student will be responsible for identifying an urgent, critical or current problematic, that may stand independently of the student’s studio practice. Rigorously researched and constructed, this paper will provide the platform for ongoing lines of investigation. Students should be versed in the critical voices and issues surrounding their own practice and develop the communication and research skills necessary to assert their own critical voice in regards to their evolving practice. Faculty and guest lectures will guide each student to a reading list appropriate to their research and final exhibition. For their final exhibition, the students will focus on creating a body of work and build a portfolio based on their artistic research, documenting the process and their different projects. This is done under the guidance and support of an internal and external thesis committee.

Masters Electives

Description

You may select an elective from the many course offerings in your department or in other departments with the approval of your department chair.

  • French
  • Drawing Technology and Perception
  • Advanced Printmaking*
  • Intellectual Property Rights
  • Concept Development Storytelling
  • Photography as Installation*
  • Photography in the Expanded Field*
  • History of New Media*
  • Designer’s Ethical and Social Responsibility
  • Educational Principles
  • Alternative Processes Image-Making*
  • Digital Fabrication Design
  • The Art of Code I & II
  • 4D Studio I & II*
  • The Fashion Editorial
  • Design Thinking
  • Social Entrepreneurship
  • Project Management*

* Undergraduate level courses

 

spring

Critical Practice and Technology II

Code
MTNM
Description

This is a year-long course building on the degree project. Projects at this stage will be designed and realized independently by the group with an advanced level of understanding and ambition. The course emphasizes intellectual, creative and technical growth. Coursework exposes students to a wide variety of New Media Art practices ranging from time-based to interactive and installations. Students are empowered through the development of self-discipline, cultural awareness, and personal voice.

The course includes a series of workshops, readings, and exercises that give students conceptual and technical skills to develop their own projects.

Marketplace for Art and Design

Description

This course will introduce and outline the role, purpose, and perception of « art » and « design » in various marketplaces and contexts for the emerging arts entrepreneur. Topics include issues in marketing aesthetic products, case studies on art fairs, art institutions and cultural events, models of consumer behavior, art, and technology, macro-economic issues that affect the arts industries, arts policy, and access, art-as-business, design in the international context, merchandising, difficulties and the impact of the various business environments on art and design disciplines.

Professional Networking Series

Code
MINT 0511
Description

Professionals from the Parisian art and design world will come in to introduce students to their professional practice and engage them in practical exercises preparing them for the job market. Instructors will be drawn from a broad range of fields: photographers and videographers; designer and architects; galleries, museums, auction houses and private collections; art fairs and international exhibitions; art dealers; curators; historians; journalists and iconographers; artists; magazine editors; I.P. and licensing lawyers, etc. This class brings together students from all the graduate programs.

Masters Electives

Description

You may select an elective from the many course offerings in your department or in other departments with the approval of your department chair.

  • French
  • Drawing Technology and Perception
  • Advanced Printmaking*
  • Intellectual Property Rights
  • Concept Development Storytelling
  • Photography as Installation*
  • Photography in the Expanded Field*
  • History of New Media*
  • Designer’s Ethical and Social Responsibility
  • Educational Principles
  • Marketplace for Art and Design
  • Photography and the Marketplace*
  • Alternative Processes Image-Making*
  • Digital Fabrication Design
  • The Art of Code I & II
  • 4D Studio I & II*
  • The Fashion Editorial
  • Design Thinking
  • Social Entrepreneurship
  • Project Management*

* Undergraduate level courses

 

Overall Credits Total
60

Frequently Asked Questions

How is this program cutting edge in contrast to other MA/MFA programs?

“Cutting-edge” technology for its own sake isn’t enough anymore; it’s what you do with it that counts. Technology has to focus on benefiting its stakeholders. What makes this program different is that the creative process taught here focuses on collaborative creativity and is very different from programs that exalt the individual artist/designer. Collaborative creativity is much more important now than driving one single vision forward and cajoling/paying people to execute it for you. That’s a very 20th century way of looking at artists and designers. The 21st century is about systems. Their complexity requires teams of creative people with different talents who can bring their ideas and work together. You have to be open to the possibility that others may have better ideas than you, and that’s not easy when students have been fed four years of manifesting certainty in their skill, talent and vision in traditional art and design programs.

What is the range of disciplines from which the students will be pooled?

We seek to have a highly diverse student group. Candidates from backgrounds including art, design, architecture, engineering, humanities, business, science and music are all encouraged to apply.

How do you know if the program is right for you?

This program is for students who want MORE than the field that they studied or work in. This program is right for you if you are looking to stretch beyond your discipline, using transdisciplinary approaches to push or blur the boundaries. For example, we are looking for:

  • Fashion students who want to work on wearable technology or smart fabrics;
  • Historians and writers who want to make better narratives for video games;
  • Architects and urbanists that want to implement systems on an urban scale;
  • Sociologists who want to design for social change;
  • Programmers and engineers who want to develop their creativity and apply their skills in creative projects;
  • Philosophy majors who want to address issues through group action;
  • Business/Management students who want to work in technology.

What are the prerequisites?

The program is open to any applicant who has successfully completed an undergraduate degree (BFA, BA, BSc, BID, BArch, etc.) with a studio component, or acquired basic technical skills (photography, art, video, programming, design, performance, music, dance, etc.) through other educational or professional experiences. Your previously acquired technical skills and creative potential will be evaluated through your portfolio.

What kind of projects have the students worked on?

Students work on projects with open-ended themes so that they can direct them with areas of previous interests. They can take the work in an artistic direction or in a design project. MA Degree and MFA Thesis projects are self-directed though. In the past, students have worked on a #LowTech project show at the Saatchi Gallery in London, showed their research at Paris Digital Week, developed an art collaboration with a group of students from ESAT Valencia and Soliman Lopez, the founder of the harddiskmuseum.com, as well as collaborated on digital fabrication techniques with Draft Ateliers. Students have developed projects focusing on physical interfaces beyond the screen and immaterial materials like sound, light and open data; and worked on projects of the body as terrain, the body in space and the hosted body. The Transdisciplinary New Media department has also hosted a 24-hour workshop with the Gaité Lyrique to create a music video for the upcoming French lo-fi band Requin Chagrin, and the videos will be premiered at the Gaité Lyrique for 2 weeks in late May as part of the Ateliers Partagés Festival.

What are the advantages of studying in Paris?

Paris is a great place for new media, between the game and software industries and digital art venues like Gaité Lyrique and Palais de Tokyo. While people may work remotely, face-to-face interactions help solidify links between people, so having direct access to Parisian networks is equally important for the graduates’ future practice. Paris attracts international talent, and you will need to go out to these venues regularly, participate in calls for projects and socialize. It is important to nurture your network.

What are some of the past thesis research topics students have chosen to explore?

A selection of past topics include

MA students

  • Interwoven Interactions;
  • Reconstructing data-inspired art through relational aesthetics;
  • Contemporary Parisian Society: A Collage;
  • Designing for the Prosumer;
  • Working Hands:  From the Repetitive Gesture to the Digital Touch;
  • Transhumanism – Transformative abilities of humans with smart clothing;
  • Cult of a Lifestyle: The Trend and Effects of Concept Stores;
  • Exhibiting Cultural Diversity: Display Policies in The Victoria and Albert Museum;
  • Creating Brand Awareness through Sensorial Experiences in the Millennial Generation;
  • The Art of Repetition Through the Lens of Technology: A Comparative Case Study of Sol LeWitt, Vera Molnar, and Casey Reas;
  • The Power of Installation Art: Marguerite Humeau, Camille Henrot, and Laure Prouvost;

MFA students

  • Beyond The Frame: Into the Experience of Virtual Art;
  • Time of Death, Death of Time;
  • Psychological Angles in Kazimir Malevich’s Suprematism;
  • The Social and Emotional Experience of the Urban Built Environment;
  • Black Twitter: The Juncture Where Cultural Identity and Digital Media Intersect;
  • Drawing on the Past: How Kandinsky influences twenty-first-century art;
  • Into The Light: Explorations of Artificial Light in Contemporary Digital Practices;
  • Sensibility and Technology: Maya Deren and John Cage’s Reflections on Technology;
  • Machines Hacking Humans: Performance Practices in Live Electronic Music during the Twenty-first Century.
 
Masters in Transdisciplinary New Media

Masters in Transdisciplinary New Media