Film Art

Bachelor of Fine Arts
in Film Art

A global joint degree offered by Emerson College & PCA

 

For centuries, the world’s greatest thinkers and artists have come to Paris to learn, create, and find inspiration.

 

This program gives you the chance to do the same.

Through a groundbreaking partnership with Emerson College, students may now apply to the new, joint global BFA in Film Art. In this one-of-a-kind program, you’ll get to create everything from experimental films and videos to gallery installations, web series, and public art — in short, you’ll be making the film and media art that shapes and defines our multicultural world. The program’s global learning environment will help you expand your intercultural competence, grow your communication abilities, cause you to challenge your own assumptions and frames of reference, and grant you a new perspective — in life, in learning, and maybe through your camera lens. As renowned French filmmaker Jean-Luc Godard said: “I know nothing of life except through the cinema.”

The global BFA program in Film Art draws on the expertise and reputations of both Paris College of Art and Emerson College and spans locations in Paris, Boston, and the Netherlands. Students will benefit from the highest international standard of film and art education within an American academic framework.

In this BFA program, you will:

  • Spend each academic year in the heart of Paris and spend your summer residencies alternating between Boston and the Netherlands
  • Create film and media art, including short experimental films and videos, gallery installations, web series, and public media art
  • Analyze and challenge your own assumptions and frame of reference while learning to see yourself as a citizen of a global, interconnected world

Combine digital filmmaking with traditional studio art practices while also engaging in media, cultural, historical, and critical studies. Broaden your understanding of contemporary art discourses and techniques, while you create compelling film art that shapes our world. Collaborate with peers from around the globe and expand your intercultural fluency and communication skills.

Ready to join the next wave of international leaders in film and media art?

Find out more about our joint Emerson/PCA global BFA in Film Art today:

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Program Details

Students will not only study visual and media arts through filming and workshops, but will also receive a rich foundation in the liberal arts and French language. In addition, students will spend:

  • Three summers in Boston. The BFA program begins and ends on Emerson’s Boston campus, where you’ll use the city as your backdrop for your creative endeavors in film and media. Learning from our faculty and using industry-level equipment and spaces, you’ll see for yourself why our program is consistently ranked in the top ten worldwide.
  • The academic years in Paris. Situated in the 10th arrondissement, Paris College of Art provides a studio learning experience through which students hone their artistic craft. Classes are taught in English, but you’ll also take French classes and develop your French language skills, study the liberal arts, and delve deep into studio practice.
  • One summer in Kasteel Well, the Netherlands. At Emerson’s beloved Kasteel Well, which is located in the picturesque Dutch countryside, students will work in 16mm motion picture film craft, engaging with a network of European filmmakers who work in an experimental vein and pushing the boundaries of the medium.

Access to Unparalleled Resources

While in Boston, you’ll benefit from the industry-level equipment and state-of-the-art studio spaces provided by the department of Visual and Media Art.

At Paris College of Art, you’ll have access to resources that include three libraries and exclusive archives originally reserved for museum curators. You’ll also have access to research opportunities and studio facilities through the school’s partnerships with other universities around Paris, and learn alongside students from other countries in a truly international environment.

Finally, you will be able to take advantage of the many art museums and cultural attractions of Paris, including the Louvre, and close proximity to Montmartre, the setting for numerous films and ideal destination for famous artists.

Learning Outcomes

We believe that travel and exploration — key elements of this program — are essential to broadening your understanding of contemporary art discourses and practices, allowing you to create new and compelling film art. Upon completion of the BFA, you’ll be able to:

Create.

  • Generate original concepts and novel approaches that advance the field of film art.
  • Demonstrate the ability to adapt, take intellectual risks, and practice divergent thinking.
  • Not only show technical expertise in the creation of film art, but also create original and meaningful film and media art.

Communicate.

  • Situate your artistic practice in relationship to current and historical art forms through written reports and oral presentations.
  • Present your work—which can find audiences in multiple countries around the world—in public forums.
  • Converse and read proficiently in French.

Collaborate.

  • Work effectively with diverse groups of people to produce film art.
  • Engage productively with diverse audiences and collaborators following inclusive artistic principles and practices.
  • Work with individuals from multiple countries on an artistic project.

Civically Engage.

  • Demonstrate an awareness of the impact that their work has on society.
  • Engage with a larger public outside of the art world through community work and projects.
  • Describe how their work promotes social justice both nationally and internationally.

Think Critically.

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the theory and history of film art.
  • Analyze, interpret, and evaluate arguments and information from a broad array of sources.
  • Analyze and assess the current economic, political, and social context for film art.

FAQs

What are the application requirements for the Global BFA in Film Art?

The requirements are the same as most other undergraduate programs at Emerson, with the exception that applicants will be required to submit an essay related to their desire to study in an intercontinental program like the global BFA in Film Art.

Is a portfolio required for admission consideration?

No, a portfolio is not required, but you may submit one if you feel that it will reflect positively on your application.

What is the application deadline?

The application deadline for the global BFA in Film Art is the same as for Emerson’s other undergraduate programs. View our deadlines.

For students admitted to the program, when is the deposit deadline and how much is the deposit?

The deposit deadline is May 1. Admitted students must submit a deposit in the amount of $1,000 by this date to ensure that they do not lose their seat in the program.

Does this program allow transfer applications?

Unfortunately at this time the structure of the curriculum does not allow for transfer student enrollment.

This program is a cohort-model program. What does that mean?

A cohort-model program means that you will collaborate closely with the students you enter the program with, all the way through to graduation. This creates a supportive and challenging sense of community that is unlike any other – providing students with a lifelong bond.

What does the academic calendar look like for this program?

Once finalized, the academic calendar specific to the global BFA in Film Art will be published online. The calendar, while demanding, does allow for breaks, with the longest one in January.

Will there be financial aid for the global BFA in Film Art?

Yes. We encourage all admission applicants to apply for need-based financial aid using both the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (for US citizens) and the CSS Profile. Applicants do not need to apply using these applications if they are non-US citizens or only want to be considered for merit scholarships.

How will I know if I am eligible for a scholarship?

If admitted into the global BFA in Film Art and awarded a scholarship, the recipient will be informed at the time of admission.

What if I want to visit Paris College of Art, but I find the cost of doing so a barrier?

If an applicant visits Paris College of Art and enrolls in the global BFA in Film Art, a $1,000 USD Grant will be awarded to the enrolled student so long as the student demonstrates financial need via the Emerson Office of Financial Aid. There will also be opportunities for virtual visits, which may remove the necessity of an actual trip. More information related to virtual open houses will be shared with interested applicants and admitted students.

Is this a joint degree between two schools? Will both schools’ names appear on my diploma?

Yes. This is a BFA from both Paris College of Art and Emerson College.

What accreditations are held by the schools teaching the curriculum?

Emerson College maintains NEASC (New England Association of Schools and Colleges) Regional Accreditation and Paris College of Art is NASAD (National Association of Schools of Art and Design) Accredited. Both accrediting agencies have stringent requirements for quality and advancement of knowledge.

How much does the global BFA in Film Art tuition cost each year?

The program’s tuition is $40,048 per year for all three years without an increase in the tuition rate. Please note that there are other additional expenses associated with this program such as travel, housing, meals, etc.

Is travel between Boston, Paris, the Netherlands, and my home considered in my Tuition and Fees?

While travel expenses are considered in the Cost of Attendance for the program (which means that you can receive financial aid to help with costs), these expenses are not a part of the direct charges billed to students in the program. Each student will have a different overall cost based on where they originate their travel.

What is the full Cost of Attendance for the global BFA in Film Art?

The costs are currently being determined based on average costs for students’ needs. The comprehensive listing of direct and indirect costs will be published once available.

Where do I live if I enroll in the global BFA in Film Art?

Housing will be provided to you while in Boston, Paris, and Kasteel Well (The Netherlands). Housing will be a separate line item on your billing statement.

During their academic years in Paris, Global BFA in Film Art students will live in furnished studio apartments in the 11th arrondissement, at 100 Rue Oberkampf, a five-story building with 192 studio apartments. The building is owned by a private company, Les Estudines, and is already home to many PCA students and students studying abroad. The surrounding area includes cafes, a supermarket, a pharmacy, a bank, and the Republique Metro station with four train lines. The building is only fifteen minutes by Metro from PCA’s campus.

During their summers in Boston, students will live in one of Emerson’s on-campus residence halls, and during their summer at Kasteel Well they will live in the castle itself.

When will my bill be due for the global BFA if I start the program in the Summer term?

Emerson will ask that balances will be paid in full by the start of the semester/term and will communicate deadlines well in advance of enrollment decisions.

Must I be full-time to enroll in the global BFA in Film Art?

Yes. It is anticipated that you will enroll and graduate with your cohort. Any deviations from the academic plan would need to be approved by the Provosts at both Emerson College and Paris College of Art.

Will I need to purchase health insurance?

You must apply for a French Social Security Number and enroll in the French Health Insurance system while in Paris. While in Boston, you must either purchase the student health insurance or submit a waiver proving comparable health insurance coverage.

What types of internships will be available to me while in Boston and in Paris?

The list of opportunities is in development and will be published once finalized. It is anticipated that there will be many different options for professional development while enrolled in this program.

Have additional questions?

Please reach out to Michael Lynch, Director of Undergraduate Admission, by emailing michael_lynch@emerson.edu or by calling 617-824-8600.

Faculty

cospen gharibian

Emmanuelle Cospen-Gharibian

Liberal Studies Coordinator
banks-miranda

Miranda Banks

Associate Professor at Emerson College
DAVIES_Lillian

Lillian Davies

Adjunct Faculty
gianvito-john

John Gianvito

Professor at Emerson College
kotz-cornejo-cristina

Cristina Kotz Cornejo

Professor at Emerson College
lin-weiko

Weiko Lin

Assistant Professor at Emerson College
massu

Isabelle Massu

Adjunct Faculty
man-for-web

Korbett Matthews

Assistant Professor at Emerson College
Barbara Portrait

Barbara Montefalcone

Chair of Liberal Studies
man-for-web

Vinicius Navarro

Assistant Professor at Emerson College
peri-francesco

Francesco Peri

Adjunct Faculty
Laurent_Pernot

Laurent Pernot

Adjunct Faculty
ralph

Karen Ralph

Adjunct Faculty
woman-for-web

Kathryn Ramey

Professor at Emerson College
robbins-juliette

Juliette Robbins

Adjunct Faculty
Julie Sage

Julie Sage

Adjunct Faculty
man-for-web

Michael Selig

Associate Professor at Emerson College
vernhes eric

Eric Vernhes

Adjunct Faculty

Curriculum

Credits

Summer 1, Boston

summer

History of Media Arts I

Code
VM100
Description

This is the first of a two-semester course that explores the historical development of the media arts, including the film, broadcasting, and sound recording industries until 1965. Investigates the relationships between economics, industrial history, and social and political systems, and the styles and techniques of specific films and broadcast programs. Special attention is given to the diversity of styles of presentation in the media.

Foundations of Media Production

Code
VM120
Description

A combination of lectures and hands-on workshops examines the relationships among photography, graphics, audio, film, video, and digital media within the context of cross- media concepts, theories, and applications. Traces the creative process from conception and writing through production and post-production. Students proceed through a series of exercises that lead to completion of a final project, establishing a foundation for advanced production coursework.

Academic Year 1, Paris

fall

Media-Based Writing (Artists as storytellers)

Description

Whether a painter, poet, fashion designer, filmmaker, interactive media-maker, or writer, artists use narrative, character, structure, setting, and tone to tell a story. In many ways, the artist creates a ”story”—a work of art—that illuminates the artist’s world or comments on the world outside the artist. This course explores how the artist creates across multiple platforms—from documentary practices in film and installation- based works, to the fictionalizing of true stories in film and other medium, to the creation of original works of painting, sculpture, and fashion—we’ll explore how artists tell their stories, why they choose the form they do, and get closer to discovering why this need to tell stories motivates the artist. The class will combine film screenings, writing exercises, slides of artworks/designs, readings, visits to artists’ studios, attendance at art exhibitions, as well as guest speakers from the worlds of art, fashion, literature, interactive media, and film. Assignments include (1) writing a story or analytical paper about an artwork, about the inspiration for an artwork, or the creation of an artwork; (2) using a painting, sculpture, or dress design as inspiration for an original story; (3) interviewing an artist and discussing what inspires them as a storyteller. Each student also completes a final project such as adapting a story into a screenplay, graphic novel, or serious game/game art, curating an exhibition of works of art around a story, or retelling an existing story into another medium—fashion, painting, or sculpture. In the world of today, we are surrounded by art that explores issues of sexuality, race, identity, politics, and the meaning of life—students will be encouraged to examine how their own art is reflected in the diverse stories that surround us.

Black & White Photography

Code
FHOT 0218
Description

The medium of photography is largely defined by its history of black and white pictures. The course will cover camera operation, principles of exposure and photographic composition concepts. The goal of this class is to provide a solid foundation of photographic black and white photography skills and techniques. It provides an overview of classic black and white photography while discussing camera techniques that apply to both traditional film and digital cameras. Students will learn how to effectively use their cameras in manual mode and make good quality negatives. The class includes camera and exposure meter instruction, technical lectures, effective scanning methods and instruction on film/digital crossover techniques.

Critical Thinking & Writing I

Code
FLIB 1011
Description

This year-long course is designed to improve critical thinking, reading, and writing skills. Students learn to understand the inherent argument and logic of a text, to think more systematically and critically, and to write more effectively by developing skills in the structure, grammar, and mechanics of writing. Students also work toward the more focused goal of situating design and art practices within larger intellectual, historical and philosophical frameworks by exploring the indissoluble connection between ideas and the products of human culture. This is achieved by introducing students to texts representing and describing various methodologies applicable to art and design, which can then be used to critique and analyze visual and material artifacts.

French Conversation 1

Code
FLIB 1001
Description

This course is a beginner-level French conversation course open to students with no previous exposure to instruction in French. Emphasis will be placed on phonetics (Rhythm, intonation, liaisons, silent letters & some specific French sounds), as well as everyday life vocabulary and exchanges. Different themes will be covered over the semester: Life in Paris, French cinema, French and Francophone cuisine, as well as music. Students will be able to engage in short conversations and will practice describing themselves and their environment, their friends and family members, as well as their studies, hobbies, and artistic practice. Visits and meetings with French students will be organized. Students will be evaluated during 5 oral presentations. Conscientious completion of homework and class participation is emphasized; a website has been specially designed to accompany students throughout the semester (Targeted grammatical exercises, podcasts, phonetics etc.) A guided tour in French will beo organized (Musée Pompidou, Musée d’Orsay.) Class will be conducted in French.

Paris Inside/Out

Code
FLIB 0010
Description

Paris Inside/Out is a one-credit course consisting of visits to art & design exhibits, as well as meetings with artists, artisans and designers in Paris. The course will use a wide approach by including a variety of artistic fields, thus allowing students to draw inspiration from any discipline. The course will be held every week in a different location in Paris. Students are free to participate in as many visits as they wish, however a minimum of 5 visits are required to pass the course. For each visit, students will create a personal work within a given set of constraints. At the end of the semester, students will be asked to present to the class a personal work inspired by one of the visits during the semester.

spring

Cinema Lighting

Description

This course is a revision of the current PCA course FFOT 0232 Lighting Techniques and will be designed to span photo and motion media lighting design, technique, aesthetics, and address practical scenarios. Students will work in the photo studio and in the field.

Critical Thinking & Writing II

Code
FLIB 1012 A
Description

This year-long course is designed to improve critical thinking, reading, and writing skills. Students learn to understand the inherent argument and logic of a text, to think more systematically and critically, and to write more effectively by developing skills in the structure, grammar, and mechanics of writing. Students also work toward the more focused goal of situating design and art practices within larger intellectual, historical and philosophical frameworks by exploring the indissoluble connection between ideas and the products of human culture. This is achieved by introducing students to texts representing and describing various methodologies applicable to art and design, which can then be used to critique and analyze visual and material artifacts.

French Conversation 1

Code
FLIB 1001
Description

This course is a beginner-level French conversation course open to students with no previous exposure to instruction in French. Emphasis will be placed on phonetics (Rhythm, intonation, liaisons, silent letters & some specific French sounds), as well as everyday life vocabulary and exchanges. Different themes will be covered over the semester: Life in Paris, French cinema, French and Francophone cuisine, as well as music. Students will be able to engage in short conversations and will practice describing themselves and their environment, their friends and family members, as well as their studies, hobbies, and artistic practice. Visits and meetings with French students will be organized. Students will be evaluated during 5 oral presentations. Conscientious completion of homework and class participation is emphasized; a website has been specially designed to accompany students throughout the semester (Targeted grammatical exercises, podcasts, phonetics etc.) A guided tour in French will beo organized (Musée Pompidou, Musée d’Orsay.) Class will be conducted in French.

Summer 2, Boston

summer

History of Media Arts II

Code
VM101
Description

This is the second of a two-semester course that explores the historical development of the media arts, focusing on the continuing development of the film, broadcasting, and sound recording industries after 1965, as well as the development of video and digital technologies. Investigates the relationships between economics, industrial history, and social and political systems, and the styles and techniques of specific films and videos, broadcast programs, and digital media products.

Introduction to Film Production

Code
VM 230
Description

Introduces the basics of non-synchronous 16mm filmmaking, including camera operation, principles of cinematography and lighting for black-and-white film, non-sync sound recording and transfers, and picture and sound editing.

Intro to Narrative Drama/Living Art in Real Space

Code
VM243
Description

Introduces students to the personnel and techniques involved in the broad category of narrative fiction production. Emphasis is placed on organization and the translation of the script into a visual narrative. Students have the opportunity to hone their production skills on a variety of creative projects. The course also prepares students for advanced-level course work and BFAs in narrative fiction.

Intro to Documentary

Code
VM242
Description

A gateway course on single-camera field production for students who want to learn the art and technology of nonfiction storytelling. Through a series of workshops, screenings, and hands-on production projects, this course emphasizes content development, storytelling strategies, and production skills in the context of relevant ethical, aesthetic, and social issues.

Academic Year 2, Paris

fall

4D: Studio: Video I

Code
FFAR0313
Description

This required junior studio provides a highly intensive introduction to video production. The fall course is an investigation of the moving image as an art form. Students will revise the basics of the language of film by further developing methodology and technical skills necessary to produce their own videos and animations. Throughout the course, students will be exposed to artists working in the field and will consider filmmaking and animation in relation to Fine Arts. Students will participate in all aspects of digital, time-based media production including concept development, storyboarding, shooting, editing, screening of final works, and DVD authoring.

Production: Cinematography

Description

This course introduces students to basic elements of the aesthetics, technology, and craft of cinematography and videography. Students gain a working knowledge of motion picture cameras, as well as basic lighting designs and equipment, with some instruction and practical application regarding crew relations and organization. It also includes a comprehensive exploration of the work of significant cinematographers. This class will simplify the tools, theories, and concepts about cinematography that seem difficult, but will also complicate some of the camera and lighting conventions that emerging filmmakers take for granted. To be an effective cinematographer you must not only master the technical aspects of the job, but also develop your creativity as visual artists and storytellers.

The first half of this semester, through a series of lectures, reading assignments, hands- on demos, and instructor-led shoots, we will focus on learning about camera, lighting, and grip equipment as well as the technical and aesthetic concepts of cinematography. The second half of the semester, we will put these tools and concepts into action through in-class productions, as well as outside-of-class production assignments that will provide students with opportunities to further practice their craft, and to produce work that showcases their creative abilities. In-depth critique sessions allow us to reflect on each other’s work and to grow as artists together.

Liberal Studies: General Biology I

Code
FLIB2004
Description

A non-technical survey course emphasizing symmetry as a unifying theme. The scientific method, the diversity, and the unity of all living things will be presented in this context. The areas of investigation include the human body, zoology, botany, and microorganisms.

spring

Liberal Studies: French Language, Dance History, Semiotics

Description

French Language and Culture
French Language and Culture is a course open to anyone who has some knowledge of French and would like to improve their listening and speaking skills. The course will cover specific themes such as Paris and its architecture, French cinema, French artists and artistic movements, as well as professional life in Paris. Students will develop key vocabulary in order to be able to communicate orally in French in everyday life situations, as well as in professional settings. Using a variety of materials, students will learn how to tell a story, make a description of their work and practice, talk about a personal experience or project, and give their opinion. Four museum guided tours in French will be organized during the semester. Conscientious completion of homework and class participation is emphasized; a website has been specially designed to accompany students throughout the semester (readings, targeted grammatical exercises, podcasts, phonetics, etc.). Class will be conducted in French.

Dance History
The course aims at giving an overview of the history of dance from classicism to post- modern dance. Even if a specific focus will be given to 20th and 21st century Western dance, the history of the discipline, the role of dance in our culture, and elements of dance philosophy and aesthetics will also be covered in the course, together with the essential reference to non-Western dance traditions.

Semiotics
Semiotics is the “science of signs.” This course will offer an introduction to the discipline of semiotics. We will read its foundational texts—from Saussure to Peirce and Barthes—and apply them to the worlds of photography, design, and fashion, as well as the media, analyzing how artifacts can be interpreted as visual manifestations of social structures. Students will have a chance to bring their own work to bear on their study and vice versa.

4D: Video II

Code
FFAR0314
Description

The spring course will introduce students to the various concepts, methodologies, and tools within the context of live video production, live performance, and interactive installations. Students will approach the different possible temporal modalities of broadcast image: real time, deferred, linear, or disruptive continuity, and the influence of these temporal modalities on the space and place of the audience.

Junior Thesis/Proposal Course

Description

Far from being the provenance of academia alone, research provides the artist with benefits that enhance the originality and impact of their work. The Junior Thesis course teaches students the importance of research to an artist’s creative practice as they learn to craft proposals for their Senior Thesis. (Note: The intention is to provide students with the time necessary to develop their thesis topics and their skills at becoming critically reflective practitioners without the time compression of creating a complete thesis from start to finish in Senior Year—to say nothing of learning and applying new approaches to their artistic practice.)

With a focus on creative research methodologies, students will develop well-defined, thoughtful thesis statements and questions. As they learn the ways that their respective artistic passions are original contributions to their disciplines, students will discover how to critically reflect upon their own work and that of other artists who engage with the themes, mediums, or aesthetic qualities of their proposed thesis projects. Students will learn how to contextualize their growing studio practice within the broader media landscape their work inhabits, imbuing their creative voices with greater intentionality and purpose.

Business Ethics

Code
FDMT 0307
Description

This course will explore the responsibilities and accountability of businesses and managers with regards to ethical behavior. Why should companies behave ethically? How can managers create organizational cultures that support ethical behavior in all employees? The course will explore the nature of the ethical dilemmas managers can face and review the legal and regulatory climate in which companies must operate. This includes an overview of organizational structures, internal auditing, corporate governance, codes of ethics and internal stakeholder issues such as product quality, customer satisfaction, supply chain issues, employee wages and benefits, and local community and environmental responsibilities. How can managers embrace transparency in operations, be accountable to critics, internal and external, while balancing the needs of stakeholders from shareholders to NGOs.

Summer 3, Kasteel Well

summer

Communications Ethics and Cultural Diversity

Code
VM307
Description

Inspects ethical issues, including racial and ethnic prejudice, discrimination, and stereotyping, from a philosophical and case study approach. Topics such as privacy, piracy, censorship, offensiveness, deception, ethnocentricity, pornography, racism, confidentiality, fairness, and hate speech are investigated in a variety of communication media—computer technology, photography, video, speech, audio, film, and print—both in international and US domains.

Academic Year 3, Paris

fall

Senior Concentration I

Code
FFAR 0403
Description

Senior Concentration is the synthesis of studio practice and theory. Senior year students will work independently to produce a conceptually coherent body of work expressing their individual artistic identity. Tutorials, guest lecturers and group critiques offer guidance and support as students focus on their chosen media, modes of expression, and research interests. The coursework culminates in a student presentation, final exhibition and assessment by a guest jury, during which students must consider issues of self-editing, display, and public presentation.

Prerequisites: Junior Core Studios

Senior Design Concepts I

Code
FFAS 0412
Description

In this final year course, students focus on conceptualizing and contextualising markets, trends, color, materials, technical considerations, and production research within individual design proposals. Reflecting their awareness of contemporary fashion, students will visibly define areas of investigative research, work methods, and fashion strategies, as well as design intentions and outcomes. While considering different product categories and retail levels, the students develop a fashion statement through appropriate accessories, looks, and styling. In the second semester students will employ a self-directed design process to achieve their thesis collection of garments and accessories based on a personally selected, clearly defined theme. They work on preparing their portfolio, brand image, and visual presentation for entry into the professional world of fashion design.

Prerequisites: Junior core studios – Semester 1 is prerequisite for semester 2.

Senior Thesis I

Code
FCMD 0450
Description

Communication Design Seniors are expected to work on a selfdefined research paper in their particular area of interest. When choosing a topic, students should consider this project to be a stepping-stone toward their future endeavours. The course is divided in two main components: 3 weeks of introduction to research and methodology, followed by a 12 week seminar which comprises weekly presentations, discussions, and in-class activities.

Prerequisites: Advanced Studio – Semester 1 or equivalent are prerequisite for semester 2

Screenwriting

Description

Online

spring

BFA Practicum

Description

Online

Senior Studio Concepts II

Code
FFAR 0445
Description

The Senior Studio Concepts course challenges and encourages the students to consolidate their ideas and personal working processes. The course will help students to negotiate the development of an independent studio practice, respecting their chosen focus and with emphasis on advanced research methodologies.
A course designed to support each student within their artistic practice and projects, through regular individual and group tutorials. A studio course based on research, process, the actual making and contextualization of their work within a given reality, space, or “white cube” situation. A course, encouraging new ways of making, revealing experimentation, developing ideas until the students feel confident to engage with professional realities.
Workshops, gallery visits, relevant museum exhibitions will help students to situate their own practice within the contemporary art context.

Prerequisites: Junior Core Studios/Senior Studio Concepts 1

Summer 4, Boston

summer

Seminar

Description

BFA Practicum

Description

Online

BFA Presentation

Description

Internship

Description
Overall Credits Total
120